Storm Over the Bay: The People of Corpus Christi and Their Port

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Texas A&M University Press, Feb 10, 2009 - Business & Economics - 187 pages
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Since the late 1830s, the natural harbor at the mouth of South Texas' Nueces River has been a center of regional maritime trade. But by the early 1900s, a storm of political wrangling, cronyism, and corruption was threatening to scuttle the city's efforts toward securing a dependable deep water port to attract international commerce to Corpus Christi. On September 14, 1919, a massive hurricane struck the bay, burying the downtown area under ten feet of debris and killing as many as one thousand people. The storm left millions of dollars of damage in its wake. The citizens of Corpus Christi, rather than being demoralized, however, were galvanized by the disaster. In gripping detail, author Mary Jo O'Rear chronicles the successful efforts of the newly unified Corpus Christi—efforts that culminated in the dedication of the Port of Corpus Christi on September 14, 1926, seven years to the day after the storm that devastated the city. Storm over the Bay will appeal to readers interested in regional history, politics, and economics. It is a must-read for anyone who appreciates Corpus Christi and its colorful past.
  

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Contents

View from the Bluff
1
The Place and the People
5
Barrier Isles and Bays
7
Castaways and Cattlemen
11
Outlets and Immigrants
17
Promises and Potential
26
Politicians and the Port
37
Populists and Patrones
39
Targets and Trials
67
Payback and Portents
80
Devastation and Death
95
Recovery and Resurgence
114
Commitment and Construction
124
View from the Bay
132
Notes
139
Bibliography
171

Protests and Progressives
48
Blocs and Balloting
58

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

MARY JO O'REAR has served in regional and local history groups and as adjunct history professor at Del Mar College in Corpus Christi and Texas A&M University–Kingsville. She is also a former instructor in history, economics, and geography for the Corpus Christi Independent School District.