The secret memoirs of Count Tadasu Hayashi, G. C. V. O..

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G. P. Putnam's sons, 1915 - Japan - 333 pages
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Page 322 - Agreement are in jeopardy, the two Governments will communicate with one another fully and frankly, and will consider in common the measures which should be taken to safeguard those menaced rights or interests.
Page 322 - Japan, in the defence of their respective interests as above described, should become involved in war with another power, the other high contracting party will maintain a strict neutrality, and use its efforts to prevent other powers from joining in hostilities against its ally. Article III. If in the above event any other power or powers should join in hostilities against that ally, the other high contract482 ing party will come to its assistance and will conduct the war in common, and make peace...
Page 323 - The Governments of Japan and France, being agreed to respect the independence and integrity of China, as well as the principle of equal treatment in that country for the commerce and subjects or citizens of all nations...
Page 322 - The High Contracting Parties agree that neither of them will, without consulting the other, enter into separate arrangements with another Power to the prejudice of the interests above described.
Page 326 - The Governments of Great Britain and Japan, actuated solely by a desire to maintain the status quo and general peace in the extreme East...
Page 328 - They are accordingly firmly resolved reciprocally to respect the territorial possessions belonging to each other in said region. 4 They are also determined to preserve the common interests of all powers in China by supporting by all pacific means at their disposal the independence and integrity of China and the principle of equal opportunity for commerce and industry of all nations in that Empire. 5 Should any event occur threatening the status quo as above described or the principle of equal opportunity...
Page 328 - Empire. 5. Should any event occur threatening the status quo as above described or the principle of equal opportunity as above defined, it remains for the two Governments to communicate with each other in order to arrive at an understanding as to what measures they may consider it useful to take. If the foregoing outline accords with the "view' of the Government of the United States, I shall be gratified to receive your confirmation. I take this opportunity to renew to Your Excellency the assurance...
Page 328 - Ocean. 2. The policy of both governments, uninfluenced by any aggressive tendencies, is directed to the maintenance of the existing status quo...
Page 322 - In case neither of the High Contracting Parties should have notified twelve months before the expiration of the said ten years the intention of terminating it, it shall remain binding until the expiration of one year from the day on which either of the High Contracting Parties shall have denounced it.
Page 327 - SIR: The exchange of views between us, which has taken place at the several interviews which I have recently had the honor of holding with you, has shown that Japan and the United States holding important outlying insular possessions in the region of the Pacific Ocean, the Governments of the two countries are animated by a common aim, policy, and intention in that region. Believing that a frank avowal of that aim...

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