Analyzing Syntax: A Lexical-Functional Approach

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 8, 2004 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 324 pages
Analyzing Syntax: A Lexical-Functional Approach is a comprehensive and accessible textbook on syntactic analysis, designed for students of linguistics at advanced undergraduate or graduate level. Working within the Lexical Functional Grammar (LFG) approach, it provides students with a framework for analyzing and describing grammatical structure, using extensive examples from both European and non-European languages. Topics covered include: tests for constituency, passivization and other relation-changing processes, reflexive pronouns, the control relation, Topic and Focus, relative clauses and Wh-questions, causative constructions, serial verbs, quirky case , and ergativity. As well as building on what linguists have learned about language in general, particular attention is paid to the unique features of individual languages. While its primary focus is on syntactic structure, the book also deals with aspects of meaning, function and word-structure that are directly relevant to syntax. Clearly organised into topics, this textbook is ideal for one-semester courses in syntax and grammatical analysis.
 

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Contents

Three aspects of syntactic structure
1
12 Outline of a framework
6
Identifying constituents and categories
22
21 Tests for constituency in Malay
23
22 Tests for constituency in English
26
23 Evidence for a VP constituent in English
32
24 Coordination subordination and recursion
39
25 Mixed categories
42
62 Marked topic and focus constructions in English
137
63 Structural representation
139
64 Basic word order
141
65 Topic and focus in other languages
142
66 Identifying topic and
161
Fillergap dependencies and relativization
165
72 Typology of relative clauses
174
73 Relative clause structures
184

English participles
50
Passives applicatives and Dative Shift
53
31 Some typological features of passives
54
32 Passive as a lexical rule
57
33 Applicative in Bantu languages
63
Dative Shift in English
73
34 Further notes on the English dative alternation
74
Indonesian verbal affixes
77
Evidence for a lexical analysis of passives
80
Reflexives
88
41 Antecedents of reflexive pronouns
89
42 Antecedents of regular pronouns
90
43 Prominence conditions
92
Subjects of imperatives in English
95
45 Conclusion
101
Control
103
52 Lexically determined control relations
104
53 Representing the control relation
107
54 Control structures in other languages
113
55 Equi vs Raising in English
120
56 Functional vs anaphoric control
127
Transitive Equi and Raising predicates
132
Pragmatic functions topic and focus
135
61 Pragmatic functions
136
74 Conclusion
189
Causative constructions
192
82 The status of the causee
194
83 The semantics of causative constructions
204
84 The structure of causative clauses
211
85 Conclusion
219
Serial verbs and related issues
222
92 Serial verbs
226
93 Clause chaining and switchreference
242
94 Serial verbs vs auxiliary verbs
251
95 Conclusion
254
Quirky case and subjecthood
257
102 Dative subject constructions in South Asian languages
269
103 Quirky nonsubjects in Cermat
276
Syntactic ergativity
280
112 Ergativity and grammatical relations
282
113 Subjecthood tests in Dyirbal
284
114 Antipassive
289
115 Syntactic ergativity in Western Austronesian
294
116 Conclusion
307
References
310
General index
320
Language index
322
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About the author (2004)

Paul R. Kroeger is Assistant Professor and Chairman at the Graduate Institute of Applied Linguistics, Dallas.

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