The Works of Robert Burns

Front Cover
T. Tegg, 1840 - Poets, Scottish - 820 pages
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Contents

Lines on Innocence 336
53
On the Poets Daughter
64
His visit to Bannockburn
65
On the Death of a LapDog named Echo
66
On seeing the beautiful Seat of Lord Galloway
67
On the same
68
On the same
69
To the same on the Author being threat ened with his resentment
70
On a Country Laird
71
On John Bushby 337
73
On a Suicide
74
Lines to John Rankine
75
To Miss Jessy Lewars
76
The Toast Lovely Jessy
77
His return to Mauchline and Marriage
78
On her recovery 338
79
80 The Blackheaded Eagle a Fragment
80
81 A Bottle and an Honest Friend
81
82 Grace after Dinner
82
83 Another
83
84 Lines to the Editor of the Star
84
FriarsCarse Hermitage
85
His Highland Mary
92
LiFE OF BURNS
96
His adventure with Ramsay of Ochtertyre
99
DUMFRIES
102
His excursion with Syme of Galloway
108
His dislike of epauletted puppies
115
130 O saw ye my dearie my Eppie MNab ib 170 Jeannies bosom Louis what reck I
131
POEMs OF BURNS
137
Rules and Regulations of the Bachelors
145
Sonnet to the Shade of Burns by Charlotte
163
Davies reply
170
xiv
173
xviii
174
Address to a Haggis
176
For a that an a that
183
The Twa Herds or the Holy Tulzie
190
Letter from a blacksmith to the ministers
199
Reply to Burnss Calf by an Unco Calf
205
Man was made to mourn A Dirge
213
bonnet at church
241
Epistle to Mr MAdam of Craigengillan
252
Verses on the Death of John MLeod Esq
268
The Hermit written on a marble Sideboard
275
Additional lines 284 approach of Spring
307
Lines on seeing Miss Fontenelle in a Favou
321
2 On Tam the Chapman
327
SONGS AND BALLADS The Songs marked are either now published for the first time or were not included in the former Edition The Mauchline ...
339
The Poets own criticism on the song
340
O Tibbie I hae seen the day
341
John Barleycorn a Ballad
342
Additional Stanzas Note
343
MºMillans Peggy
344
21 When I think on the happy days
348
Bonny Peggy Alison
349
My Jean Though cruel fate should bid us part
350
Mauchline Belles 0 leave novels c
351
Young Peggy blooms our bonniest lass
352
Eliza From thee Eliza I must go
353
The Sons of old Killie ib 34 Menie Again rejoicing Nature sees
354
On Cessnock Banks there lives a Lass
355
Braw Lads of Galla Water
364
The original Version ib To thee Lovd Nith
383
My Harry was a gallant gay Highland Young Jockey was the blithest lad
391
What can a young lassie do 400 171 Had I the wyte she bade me
419
The Fête Champêtre 0 wha will
435
SONGS AND CORRESPONDENCE
440
No I Thomson to Burns requesting the Bard
442
1793
451
Burns to ThomsonVoice of Coila
457
Burns to Thomson with Bonny
463
Burns to Thomson with Come
469
Burns to Thomson with an improved
476
To Mrs Dunlop Dec 31How CCXLII To Capt Miller DalswintonEn
477
1794
482
Thomson to Burns Wishes to know
491
Burns to Thomson Address to
502
a braw wooer cam down the lang glen
510
epistles prove that drunk or sober his mind
518
The happy marriage
527
Since robbd of all that charmd
557
Tune your Fiddles c
563
Burns to Thomson with Whistle
565
THE AYRSHIRE BALLADS
581
GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE
585
Professor Walker
588
To Miss Eliza B Lochlea on love
591
To Robert Aiken JulyWilson
597
To Dr Mackenzie Mauchline Nov
603
To Dr Moore Feb 15Scorns
609
Gren ErAL correspondence
611
To James Candlish JuneDissipation
619
1788
641
To the same June 30Man is
653
Lines written in FriarsCarse Hermitage
655
To Miss Chalmers Edinburgh
659
To John Richmond Edinburgh
665
longitude of his common size as a snail
671
To Peter Hill April 2Apostrophe ment given by a recruiting serjeantfickle
682
To Miss Williams Aug His way of account of Falconer the unfortunate Author
689
To Collector MitchellMercy
694
To William Dunbar W S Jan 17
700
To Mrs Dunlop April 11Birth
707
To Miss Benson Mar 21Pleasure rupted friendship
731
To the Farl of Glencairn MayRe
733
To Colonel W Dunbar Not
739
To Mrs Dunlop July 12His
745
FIRST COMMON PLACE BOOK BEGUN LETTERS TO CLARINDA
758
SECOND COMMON PLACEBOOK BEGUN dark postern of time long elapsdchild
764
tutelary geniusscholarcraft may be caught he minister to a mind diseased ?his hypo
773
Pac
802
Strathallans Lament Thickest night oerhang my dwelling ib 54 My Hoggie What will I do gin my Hoggie die? 36
806
on the Banks of Nith First Version
807
To the Earl of Buchan Feb Grate
808
Anecdote of Mrs Burnsib
809
His final visit to EdinburghAnecdotes 100
810
664
811
Ancient Version
812
455
814
630
815
607
816
Extempore Lines to Captain Riddel
817
650
818

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Page 222 - That wee bit heap o' leaves an' stibble Has cost thee mony a weary nibble! Now thou's turn'd out, for a' thy trouble, But house or hald, To thole the winter's sleety dribble, An' cranreuch cauld! But Mousie, thou art no thy lane, In proving foresight may be vain: The best laid schemes o' mice an' men, Gang aft agley, An' lea'e us nought but grief an
Page 232 - How Abram was the friend of God on high; Or Moses bade eternal warfare wage With Amalek's ungracious progeny; Or how the royal Bard did groaning lie Beneath the stroke of Heaven's avenging ire; Or Job's pathetic plaint and wailing cry; Or rapt Isaiah's wild, seraphic fire; Or other holy seers that tune the sacred lyre.
Page 233 - And decks the lily fair in flow'ry pride, Would, in the way His wisdom sees the best, For them and for their little ones provide; But, chiefly, in their hearts with Grace Divine preside.
Page 227 - Tho' they may gang a kennin wrang, To step aside is human : One point must still be greatly dark, The moving Why they do it ; And just as lamely can ye mark, How far perhaps they rue it. Who made the heart, 'tis He alone Decidedly can try us, He knows each chord its various tone, Each spring its various bias : Then at the balance let's be mute, We never can adjust it ; What's done we partly may compute, But know not what's resisted.
Page 221 - Wee, sleekit, cowrin, tim'rous beastie, O, what a panic's in thy breastie! Thou need na start awa sae hasty, Wi
Page 52 - Wallace's undaunted heart ; Who dar'd to, nobly, stem tyrannic pride, Or nobly die, the second glorious part, (The patriot's God, peculiarly thou art, His friend, inspirer, guardian, and reward !) O never, never, Scotia's realm desert, But still the patriot, and the patriot -bard, In bright succession raise, her ornament and guard ! MAN WAS MADE TO MOURN.
Page 300 - O'er a' the ills o' life victorious ! But pleasures are like poppies spread, You seize the flow'r, its bloom is shed ; Or like the snow falls in the river, A moment white — then melts for ever ; Or like the Borealis race, That flit ere you can point their place ; Or like the Rainbow's lovely form Evanishing amid the storm. — Nae man can tether Time nor Tide, The hour approaches Tarn maun ride ; That hour, o...
Page 232 - I've paced much this weary, mortal round, And sage experience bids me this declare: — If Heaven a draught of heavenly pleasure spare, One cordial in this melancholy vale, 'Tis when a youthful, loving, modest pair In other's arms breathe out the tender tale, Beneath the milk-white thorn that scents the evening gale.
Page 231 - My loved, my honored, much respected friend! No mercenary bard his homage pays; With honest pride, I scorn each selfish end, My dearest meed, a friend's esteem and praise: To you I sing, in simple Scottish lays, The lowly train in life's sequestered scene; The native feelings strong, the guileless ways; What Aiken in a cottage would have been; Ah!
Page 5 - You know our country custom of coupling a man and woman together as partners in the labours of harvest. In my fifteenth autumn my partner was a bewitching creature, a year younger than myself. My scarcity of English denies me the power of doing her justice in that language ; but you know the Scottish idiom — she was a bonnie, sweet, sonsie lass.

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