Michael Tolliver Lives

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Harper Collins, Oct 13, 2009 - Fiction - 320 pages
21 Reviews
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Inspiration for the Netflix Limited Series, Tales of the City

The seventh novel in the beloved Tales of the City series, Armistead Maupin’s best-selling San Francisco saga.

Nearly two decades after ending his groundbreaking Tales of the City saga of San Francisco life, Armistead Maupin revisits his all-too-human hero Michael Tolliver—the fifty-five-year-old sweet-spirited gardener and survivor of the plague that took so many of his friends and lovers—for a single day at once mundane and extraordinary... and filled with the everyday miracles of living.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - emanate28 - LibraryThing

I think I read the first Tales of the City, and Maupin's writing is always a pleasure: it's warm and wry. The first of half of this book though was way too much sexual info for my taste, maybe b/c I ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - BookConcierge - LibraryThing

Audiobook read by the author. Eighteen years after “finishing” his Tales of the City Series in 1989, Maupin returned to the beloved characters and gave readers a 7th installment. NOTE: Spoilers ahead ... Read full review

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About the author (2009)

Armistead Maupin is the author of the nine-volume Tales of the City series, which includes Tales of the City, More Tales of the City, Further Tales of the City, Babycakes, Significant Others, Sure of You, Michael Tolliver Lives, Mary Ann in Autumn, and now The Days of Anna Madrigal. Maupin's other novels include Maybe the Moon and The Night Listener. Maupin was the 2012 recipient of the Lambda Literary Foundation's Pioneer Award. He lives in San Francisco with his husband, the photographer Christopher Turner.

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