Tamerlane and other poems, republ. from the orig. ed. with a preface by R.H. Shepherd

Front Cover
1827
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
7
II
21
III
41

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 17 - Tamerlane ' he has endeavoured to expose the folly of even risking the best feelings of the heart at the shrine of Ambition. He is conscious that in this there are many faults (besides that of the general character of the poem), which he flatters himself he could, with little trouble, have corrected, but unlike many of his predecessors, he has been too fond of his early productions to amend them in his old age.
Page 17 - The greater part of the poems which compose this little volume were written in the year 1821-2, when the author had not completed his fourteenth year. They were of course not intended for publication; why they are now published concerns no one but himself.
Page 15 - Young heads are giddy, and young hearts are warm, And make mistakes for manhood to reform. Boys are, at best, but pretty buds unblown, Whose scent and hues are rather...
Page 44 - I have been happy, though in a dream. I have been happy — and I love the theme : Dreams ! in their vivid colouring of life As in that fleeting, shadowy, misty strife Of semblance with reality which brings To the delirious eye, more lovely things Of Paradise and Love — and all my own! — Than young Hope in his sunniest hour hath known.
Page 3 - Tamerlane and Other Poems. By Edgar Allan Poe. First Published at Boston in 1827 and now First Republished from a Unique Copy of the Original Edition, with a Preface. By Richard Herne Shepherd. London : George Redway : MDCCCLXXXIV. The poor little volume is now one of the bibliophile's "nuggets...
Page 18 - Ambition. He is conscious that in this there are many faults, (besides that of the general character of the poem) which he flatters himself he could, with little trouble, have corrected, but unlike many of his predecessors, has been too fond of his early productions to amend them in his old age. He will not...
Page 60 - it is a matter of the greatest difficulty to make the generality of mankind believe that one, with whom they are upon terms of intimacy, shall be called in the world a
Page 55 - Upon that spot — as upon all, And the wind would pass me by In its stilly melody, My infant spirit would awake To the terror of the lone lake. Yet that terror was not fright — But a tremulous delight, And a feeling undefined, Springing from a darken'd mind.
Page 50 - How often we forget all time, when lone, Admiring nature's universal throne, Her woods, her wilds, her waters, the intense Reply of hers to our intelligence ! Live not the stars and mountains ? Are the waves Without a spirit?
Page 45 - Be silent in that solitude Which is not loneliness — for then The spirits of the dead who stood In life before thee are again 9 In death around thee — and their will Shall overshadow thee: be still. 3 The night — tho...

Bibliographic information