Cornelius Nepos, with answered questions and imitative exercises, Part 1

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D. Appleton & co., 1846
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Page 216 - A DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE; containing the Pronunciation, Etymology, and Explanation of all Words authorized by eminent writers ; to which are added a Vocabulary of the Roots of English Words, and an accented list of Greek, Latin, and Scripture Proper Names. By Alexander Reid, AM, Rector of the Circus School, Edinburgh.
Page 222 - NEW METHOD OF LEARNING TO READ, WRITE, AND SPEAK THE FRENCH LANGUAGE.
Page 89 - Non enim mediocriter moveor auctoritate tua, Balbe, orationeque ea, quae me in perorando cohortabatur, ut meminissem me et Cottam esse et pontificem. Quod eo, credo, valebat, ut opiniones, quas a maioribus accepimus de dis immortalibus, sacra, caerimonias religionesque defenderem.
Page 221 - Standard Pronouncing Dictionary of the French and English Languages. In two Parts. Part I., French and English; Part II., English and French. The first Part, comprehending words in common use— terms connected with Science — terms belonging to the Fine Arts...
Page 225 - M. Michelet, in his history of the Roman Republic, first introduces the reader to the Ancient Geography of Italy ; then by giving an excellent picture of the present state of Rome and the surrounding country, full of grand ruins, he excites in the reader the desire to investigate the ancient history of this wonderful land. He next imparts the results of the latest investigations, entire, deeply studied and clearly arranged, and saves the uneducated reader the trouble of investigating the sources,...
Page 225 - Rome and the surrounding country, full of grand ruins, he excites in the reader the desire to investigate the ancient history of this wonderful land. He next imparts the results of the latest investigations, entire, deeply studied and clearly arranged, and saves the uneducated reader the trouble of investigating the sources, while he gives to the more educated mind an impetus to study the literature from which he gives very accurate quotations in his notes. He describes the peculiarities and the...
Page 225 - ... PRONUNCIATION, ETYMOLOGY, AND EXPLANATION Of all words authorized by eminent writers ; TO WHICH ARE ADDED, A VOCABULARY OF THE ROOTS OF ENGLISH WORDS...
Page 219 - The object of this Work is to enable the Student, as soon as he can decline and conjugate with tolerable facility, to translate simple sentences after given examples, and with given words; the principles trusted to being principally those of imitation and very frequent repetition.
Page 226 - has been to produce a succinct and connected development of the vivid and eventful course of our country's history, written in a style calculated to excite the interest and sympathy of my readers, and of such especially who, not seeking to enter upon a very profound study of the...
Page 219 - A child learns his own language by imitating what he hears, and constantly repeating it till it is fastened in tha memory. In the same way Mr. A. puts the pupil immediately to work at Exercises in Latin and Greek involving the elementary principles of the language — words are supplied — the mode of putting them togeiher is told the pupil — he is shown how the Ancients expressed their ideas; and then by repeating these things again and again— iterum itenanquc — the docile punil has them...

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