Narrative of a Voyage of Discovery to Africa and Arabia: Performed in His Majesty's Ships, Leven and Barracouta, from 1821 to 1826, Under the Command of Capt. F. W. Owen, R. N.

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R. Bentley, 1835 - Africa, East - 893 pages
 

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Page 61 - ... menacing attitude rushed open-mouthed at the boat, and with one grasp of its tremendous jaws seized and tore seven planks from her side. The creature disappeared for a few seconds, and then rose again, apparently intending to repeat the attack, but was fortunately deterred by the contents of a musket discharged in its face.
Page 367 - ... endeavoured to remove their fears by friendly motions to advance, and by means of one of our seamen, who spoke a little Arabic. We imagined, of course, that they belonged to the coast, but by venturing too far out had been blown off. To our astonishment they replied in French, inquiring in a most anxious manner if we were of that nation, and on receiving an answer to the contrary, they uttered a cry of joy, and paddled alongside as fast as their little remaining strength would allow. 4 Upon coming...
Page 272 - Marooro, many were firmly knit, stout and elegantly proportioned: some were perfect models of the human form. They go naked, with the exception of a piece of cloth, barely sufficient for decency of appearance. Some have their beard shaved, others only in part, but many not at all. In this latter case the hair, for it is worthy of remark that they have not wool, grows long, is neatly plaited, and hanging in slender tails, communicates to the countenance a wild and savage aspect, in this resembling...
Page 112 - No. 3. mouth of the Trois Pistoles River, that in which the railway cutting has been made, is about one hundred and fifty feet above the level of the sea, and is composed of clay capped with sand and gravel. At no great distance inland, there rises a second terrace one hundred and sixty feet higher than the first, or about three hundred and ten feet above the sea. In some places the front of this terrace is cut into two or more. It consists of clay capped...
Page 270 - ... noon hour, and dined at two, the table groaning beneath a profusion of meats, dressed in a variety of ways, in which port wine generally formed a principal ingredient. After the meal was ended, and he had smoked another charote, the old gentleman once more retired to rest, and did not rise again until the coolness of the evening drew him forth, enveloped in a cloak, to enjoy the refreshing air ; at nine he took supper, and shortly after retired to bed.
Page 61 - Irritating him, occasioned this furious nttack, and had he got his upper jaw above the gunwale, the whole broadside must have been torn out. The force of the shock from beneath, previously to the attack, was so violent that her stern was almost lifted out of the water, and Mr. Tambs, the midshipman steering, was thrown overboard, but fortunately rescued before the irritated animal could seize him.
Page 66 - ... close under his arms, and hung down about twelve . inches, the end of each tail being cut with much precision and regularity; the lower row resembled the upper, and commenced exactly where the latter terminated, until they reached the knees. It bore altogether a great resemblance to the Scotch kilt. On his ankles and wrists he had brass rings or bangles. His shield was of bullock's hide, about five feet long, and three and a half broad...
Page 64 - ... underneath this his black woolly hair was hidden ; but above it grew to its usual length, until at the top, where a circular space was shaved in the manner of the monks and...
Page 376 - Their extraordinary build did not fail to attract our attention. They are generally sixty feet long and fourteen broad, their head terminating in a long point, and their stern in one not much shorter ; and, as they are built like a wedge, so, on grounding and being left by the tide, or hauled up on purpose, they require to be shored in that position by logs, which they always carry. Their planking is more frequently secured to the ribs by Cairo lashings than by nails or bolts ; and with some the...
Page 392 - The people 3 we found there are large and well formed ; they have no other arms than bows and arrows, in the use of which they are very dexterous. The men have one of their nipples bored from side to side, and some have both, wearing a cane in each, the length of two palms and a half, and the thickness of two fingers. They have the under lip also bored, and wear in it a piece of cane the breadth of half a finger. Their women are accustomed to...

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