Essentials of Biology Presented in Problems: By George William Hunter

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American book Company, 1911 - Biology - 448 pages
 

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Page 405 - As we become permanent drunkards by so many separate drinks, so we become saints in the moral, and authorities and experts in the practical and scientific spheres, by so many separate acts and hours of work.
Page 405 - The hell to be endured hereafter, of which theology tells, is no worse than the hell we make for ourselves in this world by habitually fashioning our characters in the wrong way.
Page 405 - I won't count this time." Well ! he may not count it, and a kind Heaven may not count it ; but it is being counted none the less. Down among his nerve cells and fibers the molecules are counting it, registering and storing it up to be used against him when the next temptation comes.
Page 405 - Let no youth have any anxiety about the upshot of his education, whatever the line of it may be. If he keep faithfully busy each hour of the working day, he may safely leave the final result to itself. He can with perfect certainty count on waking up some fine morning to find himself one of the competent ones of his generation, in whatever pursuit he may have singled out..
Page 405 - Could the young but realize how soon they will become mere walking bundles of habits, they would give more heed to their conduct while in the plastic state. We are spinning our own fates, good or evil, and never to be undone. Every smallest stroke of virtue or of vice leaves its never so little scar. The drunken Rip Van Winkle, in Jefferson's play, excuses himself for every fresh dereliction by saying, 'I won't count this time!
Page 380 - One of the most common and pernicious of the popular errors relating to alcohol is the supposition that it somehow strengthens the heart. The full, bounding pulse, usually produced by the administration of an ounce or two of brandy, gives the impression of an increased vigor of heart action; but it is only necessary to determine the blood pressure by means of a Riva-Rocci instrument or Gaertner's tonometer, to discover that the blood pressure is not raised and may be lowered.
Page 427 - If one's use of diet and air is proper, the fatigue point will be much further off than otherwise. One should learn to relax when not in activity. The habit produces rest, even between exertions very close together, and enables one to continue to repeat those exertions for a much longer time than otherwise. The habit of lying down when tired is a good one. The same principles apply to mental rest. Avoid worry, anger, fear, excitement, hate, jealousy, grief, and all depressing or abnormal mental states....
Page 347 - In small doses these substances are oxidized in the body and yield a corresponding amount of energy, but their value from this standpoint is altogether unimportant compared with their action as stimulants. Alcohol also, when not taken in too large quantities, may be oxidized in the body, and furnish a not inconsiderable amount of energy. It is, however, a matter of controversy at present whether alcohol in small doses can be considered a true foodstuff, capable of serving as a direct source of energy,...
Page 414 - In like manner the influence of all drugs which affect the nervous system must be in the direction of disintegration. The healthy mind stands in clear and normal relations with Nature. It feels pain as pain. It feels action as pleasure. The drug which conceals pain or gives a false pleasure when pleasure does not exist forces a lie upon the nervous system.
Page 430 - If we count the value of each life lost at only $1,700 and reckon the average earning lost by illness at $700 per year for grown men, we find that the economic gain from mitigation of preventable disease in the United States would exceed $1,500,000,000 a year.

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