"Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!": Adventures of a Curious Character

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Unwin Paperbacks, 1986 - Physicists - 350 pages
Winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1965, Richard Feynman was one of the world's greatest theoretical physicists, but he was also a man who fell, often jumped, into adventure. An artist, safecracker, practical joker and storyteller, Feynman's life was a series of combustible combinations made possible by his unique mixture of high intelligence, unquenchable curiosity and eternal skepticism. Over a period of years, Feynman's conversations with his friend Ralph Leighton were first taped and then set down as they appear here, little changed from their spoken form, giving a wise, funny, passionate and totally honest self-portrait of one of the greatest men of our age.

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User Review  - lanewillson - LibraryThing

When I conjure a Nobel Laureate in physics in my mind’s eye, some very definite attributes emerge. I think of a man, yes, a man, because my inner Papaw is stuck in 1915. I think of someone who worked ... Read full review

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User Review  - EricCostello - LibraryThing

Not quite an autobiography, more a series of anecdotal snapshots and musings. The man to whom Feynman spoke had hoped this would not be the only memoirs we'd get out of Feynman, but alas! It appears ... Read full review

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About the author (1986)

Richard Feynman, an American theoretical physicist, received his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1942 and worked at Los Alamos, New Mexico, on the atomic bomb during World War II. From 1945 to 1950, he taught at Cornell University and became professor of theoretical physics at the California Institute of Technology in 1950. Feynman made important contributions to quantum electrodynamics (QED) and electromagnetic interactions, such as interactions among electrons. In Feynman's approach, interactions are considered exchanges of virtual particles. For example, Feynman explained the interaction of two electrons as an exchange of virtual photons. Feynman's theory has proved to be accurate in its predictions. In 1965 the Nobel Prize for physics was awarded to three pioneers in quantum electrodynamics: Feynman, Julian Schwinger, and Sin-Itiro Tomonaga. Feynman was an outspoken critic of NASA for its failure to notice flaws in the design of the Challenger space shuttle, which resulted in its tragic explosion.

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