A treatise on the diseases of the chest, tr. by J. Forbes

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Contents

OF BRONCHIAL HÆMORRHAGE
76
Relative value of mediate and immediate auscultation
77
Of the treatment of hooping cough
95
OF DILATATION OF THE BRONCHI
100
Andral and Williams on the nature and cause of dilatation of
102
OF POLYPUS OF THE BRONCHIAL MEMBRANE
112
Of the knowledge of croup by the ancients
115
Of local applications to the air passages in cronp M L
122
Louis and Hastings on ulcers in the bronchi
128
DISEASES OF THE LUNGS
135
Op EMPHYSEMA OF THE LUNGS
141
Andral and Piedagnels opinions on empyema 11 L
145
On pulmonary empyema in hares hawks c Opinions of Sir
151
Frequency of vesicular emphysema
157
Literature of emphysema of the lungs
163
Treatment of ædema of the lungs M L Tr
170
OF PULMONARY APOPLEXY
171
of the history nature and causes of pulmonary apoplexy
176
Case VI
182
Of the relative frequency of inflammation in the right and lefi lungs
188
Signs and symptoms of Pneumonia
194
Of the value of the crepitous rhonchus as a sign in pneumonia
195
On certain forms of expectoration in pneumonia and on the impor
203
Of gangrene of the lungs
207
Of Chronic Pneumonia
216
Of chronic pneumoniaits rareness
217
Of the treatment of pneumonia with tartar emetic in large doses 244
218
Of bloodletting in the later stages of pneumonia
223
Treatment of phthisis
227
Of the use of calomel and opium in pneumonia
229
Of Dr A Laennecs experience of tartar emetic M L
237
Literature of pneumonia
251
Or phthisIS PULMONALIS
252
Of the nature and origin of tubercles M L
257
Identity of grey granulations and yellow tubercles M L
263
State of the mucous membranes in phthisis M L
269
of the secretion of tubercles in the aircells M L
276
Of cicatrices in the lungs
289
Relation of hæmoptysis to pulmonary tubercles M L Tr
302
of the state of the respiration in the early stage of phthisis
313
Of pleuritic pains in phthisis
320
Of diarrhea in phthisis
326
Of issues in phthisis
332
Means of softening tubercles
334
Importance of prophylactic treatment in phthisis
339
OF CONCRETIONS IN THE LUNGS
351
Chemical analysis of the black pulmonary matter
357
Of the frequency and diagnosis of chronic pleurisy
418
Of diaphragmitis
432
Of the operation of empyema
443
OF HYDROTHORAX
448
Of the connexion between hydrothorax and inflammation
450
CASE XXX
454
Of EDEMA OF THE LUNGS
456
Of the usual origin and cause of pneumothorax
457
Of the symptoms of pneumothorax
461
Relative frequency of pneumothorax on both sides M L
484
Case X
488
PART THIRD
494
True rythm or progressive movements of the different parts of
505
Nonisochronism of the ventricular systole and arterial pulse
511
OF ANOMALOUS SOUNDS
516
Of the musical bellowssound
517
Of the purring thrill and its relation to the rasp sound M L Tr
525
Peculiar variety of intermitting pulse
531
OF DISEASES OF THE HEART
536
Of the general symptoms of disease of the heart
537
OF HYPERTROPHY OF THE HEART 544
544
OF DILATATION OF THE VENTRICLES
551
OF DILAT OF ONE VENT WITH HYP OF THE OTHER
557
OF INDURATION OF THE HEART
564
OF ATROPHY OF THE HEART 570
570
OF CARDITIS
576
Literature of carditis and pericarditis
579
OF FATTY DISEASE OF THE HEART
583
Case of valvular disease of the heart
590
Of cardiac asthma
596
OF POLYPI OF The Heart
599
Literature of polypus of the heart
602
OF EXCRESCENCES ON THE VALVES c
611
Of the origin of valvular excrescences
612
OF PERICARDITIS
620
Of the leathercreak as a sign of pericarditis
625
Of PNEUMOPERICARDIUM
630
Or the auscultatory diagnostics of aneurism of the aorta
640
OF THE TREATMENT OF DISEASES OF THE HEART
641
Of the iinportance of removing gastric and other irritations in dis
647
OF NERVOUS AFFECTIONS OF THE HEART c
648
Of the treatment of angina pectoris
654
Palpitation of the heart
655
Treatment
661
Value of auscultation in the diagnosis of pregnancy
666
Literature of diseases of the chest in general
672
EXPLANATION OF The Plates

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Page xlii - of discovering the internal motions and actions of bodies by the sound they make. Who knows but that, as in a watch we may hear the beating of the balance, and the running of the wheels, and the striking of the
Page xlii - also from experience, that 1 have been able to hear very plainly the beating of a man's heart ; and it is common to hear the motion of the wind to and fro in the guts and other
Page 279 - their progress, but neither can reverse it. But while I admit the incurability of consumption in the early stages, I am convinced, from a great number of facts, that, in some cases, the disease is curable in the latter stages, that is, after the softening of the tubercles and the formation of an ulcerous excavation.
Page xlii - lungs is easily discovered by the wheezing, the stopping of the head by the humming and whistling noises, the slipping to and fro of the joints, in many cases by crackling and the like. As to the working or motion of the
Page xlii - noise of fire in dissolving, of water in boiling, of the parts of a bell after that its motion is grown quite invisible as to the eye ; for to me these motions and the other seem only to differ
Page 23 - answering to the entrance of the air into, and its expulsion from, the air-cells of the lungs. This murmur may be compared to that produced by a pair of bellows whose valve makes no noise, or, still better, to that emitted by a person in a deep and placid sleep, who makes now and then a profound inspiration.|
Page xlii - and distinguish them [to try the contrivance about an artificial tympanum] as they are; for the doing of both which I think it is not impossible but that in many cases there may be helps found, some of which I may, as opportunity is offered, make trial of, which, if successful and useful, I shall not conceal.
Page xlii - impossible cannot much improve my knowledge, so the believing them possible may, perhaps, be an occasion for taking notice of such things as another would pass by without regard as
Page xlii - by the generality of men, and never so seemingly mad, foolish, and fantastic ; that, as the thinking them impossible cannot much improve my knowledge, so the believing them possible may, perhaps, be an occasion
Page 333 - that bleeding can neither prevent the formation of tubercles nor cure them when formed. It ought never to be employed in the treatment of consumption except to remove inflammation or active determinations of blood, with which the disease may be complicated ; beyond this, its operation can only tend to an useless loss of strength.*

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