Genealogy of the Mckinstry Family: With a Preliminary Essay on the Scotch-Irish Immigrations to America

Front Cover
David Tucker, printer, 1866 - Scotch-Irish in the United States - 46 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 13 - ... to prevent mistake or disappointment, on the one hand, and contention or disagreement on the other ; " Therefore be it known to all whom it may concern that we, the undersigned, citizens of...
Page 12 - Christians" has an entire and complete power of jurisdiction over its members, to be exercised by the elders thereof within itself.
Page 15 - ... health failing, he rested at East Windsor in Connecticut. The parish in the eastern precinct of the town, afterwards called Ellington, having no preacher, he was requested to supply the pulpit. This circumstance resulted in a suspension of his journey southward, and a settlement over that parish, as its first pastor, in 1733. He continued in this situation sixteen years, and remained in the town until his death; which took place on Sunday. January 20, 1754, at the age of 77 years. He preached...
Page 8 - Rev. Mr. McGregor, in a sermon which he preached on the eve of the departure from Ireland, assigned the following reasons for their removal to America: 1. To avoid oppressive and cruel bondage; 2. To shun persecution; 3. To withdraw from the communion of idolaters; 4. To have an opportunity of worshipping God according to the dictates of conscience and his inspired word.
Page 14 - McKinstry concluded to join bis brethren of the same denomination in New York. On his way thither, his wife's health failing, he rested at East Windsor in Connecticut. The parish in the eastern precinct of the town, afterwards called Ellington, having no preacher, he was requested to supply the pulpit. This circumstance resulted in a suspension of his journey southward, and a settlement over that parish, as its first pastor, in 1733. He continued in this situation sixteen years, and remained in the...
Page 9 - 3100 men, women and children went from Ireland to America in 1727, and 4200 in three years, all protestants." The principal seats of these emigrations were Pennsylvania and the Middle States. New England was found not so favorable to their farming and other interests.
Page 8 - ... secure retreats of Ulster; and thither they escaped as best they could, some crossing the narrow sea in open boats. They carried their household gods with them, and their religious peculiarities became more dear in their land of exile, for the dangers and sorrows through which they had borne them. This is the race — composed of various tribes, flowing from different parts of Scotland — which furnished the population in the north of Ireland, familiarly known as the Scotch-Irish. This term...
Page 13 - ... descent, and was the son of Rodger McKinstry and Mary Wilson, who lived in the neighborhood of Edinburgh, until compelled by the persecutions under Charles II., about 1669, to seek security and repose with their Presbyterian brethren in the province of Ulster, and the county of Antrim. Their son John was educated at the University of Edinburgh, from which he graduated Master of Arts in 1712. It may gratify the curious to see the Diploma which that University then granted to its graduates, which...
Page 5 - ... the British rule, and to introduce a higher state of cultivation into that portion of his domains. To promote this object liberal offers of land were made, and other inducements held out in England and Scotland for colonists to occupy this wide and vacant territory. This was about the year 1610.
Page 5 - The project was eagerly embraced, companies and colonies were formed, and individuals without organization were tempted to partake of the advantageous offers of the government. A London company — among the first to enter upon this new acquisition — -established itself at Derry, and gave such character to the place as to cause it to be known and called the city of Londonderry. The principal emigration, however, was from Scotland.

Bibliographic information