Exeter in 1776: Sketches of an Old New Hampshire Town as it was a Hundred Years Ago

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News-letter Press, 1876 - Exeter (N.H.) - 39 pages
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Page 15 - Exeter, he having been born in 1 703, and as he lived to the good old age of eighty-five, he witnessed many changes, and in the end very great improvements in his native town. He was for a long period a leading citizen. He had the command of a regiment in the French war and served with much credit, receiving subsequently the honor of a Brigadier General's commission. For twelve successive years he was Speaker of the Assembly of the province, and in 1772 and 1773 he was a member of the Governor's...
Page 8 - ... again established here, and the town became practically the headquarters of all military undertakings in which New Hampshire was concerned. And here on the fifth day of January, 1776, was adopted and put in operation the First Written Constitution for popular government, of the Revolutionary period. The honor of taking the lead of her sister colonies in this momentous "new departure " belongs to New Hampshire, and Exeter may well be proud to have been the scene of an occurrence so interesting...
Page 37 - ... to join with the other colonies in declaring the thirteen united colonies a free and independent state — solemnly pledging our faith and honor, that we will on our parts support the measure with our lives and fortunes...
Page 8 - It was built about 1 760, and has apparently undergone little repair since that time. It probably first held military stores destined for the French and Indian war, which, however, terminated before they could have been much needed. A few years later it was opened, no doubt, to receive a part of the powder captured by the provincials in the raid, under Sullivan, upon Fort William and Mary in Portsmouth harbor, in December, 1774. But as powder without ball hardly met the requirements of the times,...
Page 13 - ... enjoyment as well as for the size of the congregations, in the matter of conveniences and comforts there is no retrogression. Improvements once introduced become necessities ; and New England will never go back to cold churches. The meeting house of the first parish had long been provided with a bell, and the town books inform us that in 1776 it was daily rung by Pompey Peters at one and nine o'clock p.
Page 30 - President Weare, chairman of the Committee of Safety, delegated Col. Folsom to visit Gen. Stark, to convey to him money for present expenses, to see what articles were immediately needed, and "advise with all persons in the service of the State of New-Hampshire on such things as he thought needful to forward the business they are engaged in.
Page 32 - Eliphalet Giddings, the collector of the " beef tax," should be included with them. Dr. Samuel Tenney was a surgeon in one of the Rhode Island regiments. He had previously settled in this town, and returned and married a wife here at the expiration of his service. He was a person of uncommon literary and scientific attainments, and contributed articles to the publications of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a topographical account of Exeter to the Collections of the Massachusetts Historical...
Page 22 - He had been for some time engaged in ship-building here, and was a man of enterprise and determination. He was no laggard in evincing his willingness to enlist in his country's cause, for he was one of the first to march to the scene of hostilities on the morning after the Concord fight. The unanimous voice of his fellow volunteers made him the commander of the extemporized company, and he acquitted himself well of the trust. Repeatedly, afterwards, during the war, he was chosen to important military...
Page 24 - He afterwards removed his residence to Exeter, where he passed the remainder of his life. Toward the close of his career he was annoyed by pecuniary troubles, and is said to have become petulant and rough in his manners. Many stories are yet current, of his sharp speeches and harsh conduct. Gen. Peabody was undoubtedly possessed of abilities far above the average, and rendered valuable service as a legislator to his state and country, and in his professional capacity to the sick and suffering. We...
Page 38 - No firing of cannon or ringing of bells was needed to give eclat to the occasion ; the general joy was too sincere and heartfelt to find expression in noisy demonstrations. Meshech Weare, the President of the state, Mathew Thornton, who was himself soon to set his hand to the instrument, Gen.

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