Social and Political Thought of Julius Evola

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Taylor & Francis, Apr 21, 2011 - Political Science - 192 pages
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Julius Evola’s writing covered a vast range of subjects, from a distinctive and categorical ideological outlook and has been extremely influential on a significant number of extreme right thinkers, activists and organisations. This book is the first full length study in English to present his political thought to a wider audience, beyond that of his followers and sympathisers, and to bring into the open the study of a neglected strand of contemporary Western thought, that of traditionalism.

Evola deserves more attention because he is an influential writer. His following comes from an important if largely ignored political movement: activists and commentators whose political positions are, like his, avowedly traditionalist, authoritarian, anti-modern, anti-democratic and anti-liberal. With honourable exceptions, contemporary academic study tends to treat these groups as a minority within a minority, a sub-species of Fascism, from whom they are held to derive their ideas and their support. This work seeks to bring out more clearly the complexity of Evola’s post-war strategy, so as to explain how he can be adopted both by the neo-fascist groups committed to violence, and by groups such as the European New Right whose approach is more aimed at influence from within liberal democracies. Furlong also recognises the relevance of Evola’s ideas to anti-globalisation arguments, including a re-examination of his arguments for detachment and spontaneism (apolitia).

 

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Contents

Evola in context
1
2 Magic idealism and the need for the absolute
23
3 Tradition and history
37
4 A rigorous political doctrine
53
5 Nations nationalism empire and Europe
74
Men and ruins
87
7 Race sex and antiSemitism
113
Evola and modern conservatism
134
Notes
155
Bibliography
166
Index
171
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About the author (2011)

Paul Furlong Professor of European Studies and Head of School, School of European Studies, Cardiff University.

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