Prince Prigio

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J. W. Arrowsmith, 1889 - Children's stories, English - 144 pages
 

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Page 19 - Prigio alive (which he could easily do, as I have said; for he is all over as hot as a red-hot poker), or that, if the Prince succeeded, at least his country would be freed from the monster. But the Prince, who was lying on the sofa doing sums in compound division, for fun, said in the politest way: 'Thanks to the education Your Majesty has given me, I have learned that the Firedrake, like the siren, the fairy, and so forth, is a fabulous animal which does not exist. But even granting, for the sake...
Page 17 - Prigio even more than other people did, "was not ill pleased, for," thought he, "of course my three sons must go after the brute, the eldest first, and as usual it will kill the first two and be beaten by the youngest. It is a little hard on Enrico, poor boy, but anything to get rid of that Prigio!" This fairy-tale reasoning did not, however, appeal to that Prince (who, by the way, was lying on a sofa "doing sums in compound division for fun"), and he pointed out that if the King were right, the...
Page 94 - ... and without his carpet he can't get away, for the soldiers have orders to seize him as soon as he appears in the street. And in the meantime Benson will be pretending that he killed the Firedrake — for he must have got to Falkenstein by now, — and they will be for marrying him to the king's niece, and making my butler crown prince to the kingdom of Pantouflia ! It is dreadful ! " Now all this time the prince was on the balcony, telling Lady Rosalind all about how he got the Firedrake done...
Page 84 - And here is the second proclamation : REWARD. THE FIREDRAKE. Whereas, Our dominions have lately been devastated by a Firedrake (the Salamander Furiosus of Buffon) ; This is to advise all, That whosoever brings the horns and tail of the said Firedrake to our Castle of Falkenstein, shall receive FIVE THOUSAND PURSES, the position of Crown Prince, with the usual perquisites, and the hand of the king's niece, the Lady Molinda. GROGNIO R. " H'm," said the prince ; " I did not think his majesty wrote so...
Page 73 - Firedrake came quicker yet, flying and clashing his fiery wings. At last they were within striking distance; and the Firedrake, stooping from the air, dashed with his burning horns and flaming feet slap into the body of the Remora. Then there rose a steam so dreadful, such a white yet fiery vapor of heat, that no one who had not the prince's magic glass could have seen what happened. With horrible grunts and roars the Firedrake tried to burn his way right through the flat body of the Remora, and...
Page 109 - ... the reward was offered for bringing the horns and tail, not for killing the monster. But were the king's intentions to go for nothing? When a subject only meant well, of course he had to suffer; but when a king said one thing, was he not to be supposed to have meant another? Any fellow with a wagon could bring the horns and tail; the difficult thing was to kill the monster. If Benson's claim was allowed, the royal prerogative of saying one thing and meaning tmething else was in danger.
Page 47 - Something seemed to give a whir! in his brain, and in one instant he knew all about it! He believed in fairies and fairy gifts, and understood that his cap was the cap of darkness, and his shoes the seven-league boots, and his purse the purse of Fortvmatus! He had read about those things in historical books: but now he believed in them.

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