Statistical Models: Theory and Practice

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 27, 2009 - Mathematics
This lively and engaging book explains the things you have to know in order to read empirical papers in the social and health sciences, as well as the techniques you need to build statistical models of your own. The discussion in the book is organized around published studies, as are many of the exercises. Relevant journal articles are reprinted at the back of the book. Freedman makes a thorough appraisal of the statistical methods in these papers and in a variety of other examples. He illustrates the principles of modelling, and the pitfalls. The discussion shows you how to think about the critical issues - including the connection (or lack of it) between the statistical models and the real phenomena. The book is written for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students in statistics, as well as students and professionals in the social and health sciences.
 

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Contents

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Copyright

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About the author (2009)

David A. Freedman is Professor of Statistics at the University of California, Berkeley. He has also taught in Athens, Caracas, Jerusalem, Kuwait, London, Mexico City, and Stanford. He has written several previous books, including a widely used elementary text. He is one of the leading researchers in probability and statistics, with 200 papers in the professional literature. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2003, he received the John J. Carty Award for the Advancement of Science from the National Academy of Sciences, recognizing his 'profound contributions to the theory and practice of statistics'. Freedman has consulted for the Carnegie Commission, the City of San Francisco, and the Federal Reserve, as well as several departments of the US government. He has testified as an expert witness on statistics in law cases that involve employment discrimination, fair loan practices, duplicate signatures on petitions, railroad taxation, ecological inference, flight patterns of golf balls, price scanner errors, sampling techniques, and census adjustment.

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