The Addiction Treatment Planner

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John Wiley & Sons, Nov 7, 2005 - Psychology - 360 pages
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The Addiction Treatment Planner, Third Edition provides all the elements necessary to quickly and easily develop formal treatment plans that satisfy the demands of HMOs, managed care companies, third-party payors, and state and federal review agencies.
  • This Third Edition includes new language for evidence-based care that fits mandates set forth by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), which are being adopted by most state accrediting bodies
  • New chapters cover chronic pain, dangerousness/lethality, opioid dependence, and self-care
  • Saves you hours of time-consuming paperwork, yet offers the freedom to develop customized treatment plans
  • Organized around 42 main presenting problems, including chemical and nonchemical addictions such as substance abuse, eating disorders, schizoid traits, and others
  • Over 1,000 well-crafted, clear statements describe the behavioral manifestations of each relational problem, long-term goals, short-term objectives, and clinically tested treatment options
  • Easy-to-use reference format helps locate treatment plan components by behavioral problem or DSM-IV-TR diagnosis
  • Includes a sample treatment plan that conforms to the requirements of most third-party payors and accrediting agencies (including HCFA, JCAHO, and NCQA)
 

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Contents

ADULTCHILDOFANALCOHOLIC ACOA TRAITS
14
ANGER
23
ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOR
31
ANXIETY
38
ATTENTIONDEFICITHYPERACTIVITY DISORDER ADHD
46
ATTENTIONDEFICITINATTENTIVE DISORDER ADD
53
BORDERLINE TRAITS
59
CHILDHOOD TRAUMA
67
OPIOID DEPENDENCE
182
OPPOSITIONAL DEFIANT BEHAVIOR
190
PARENTCHILD RELATIONAL PROBLEM
197
PARTNER RELATIONAL CONFLICTS
203
PEER GROUP NEGATIVITY
209
POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER PTSD
215
PSYCHOSIS
221
RELAPSE PRONENESS
229

CHRONIC PAIN
74
DANGEROUSNESSLETHALITY
83
DEPENDENT TRAITS
89
DEPRESSION
96
EATING DISORDERS
104
FAMILY CONFLICTS
112
GAMBLING
118
GRIEFLOSS UNRESOLVED
125
IMPULSIVITY
132
LEGAL PROBLEMS
139
LIVING ENVIRONMENT DEFICIENCY
144
MANIAHYPOMANIA
150
MEDICAL ISSUES
156
NARCISSISTIC TRAITS
162
NICOTINE ABUSEDEPENDENCE
168
OCCUPATIONAL PROBLEMS
175
SELFCARE DEFICITSPRIMARY
235
SELFCARE DEFICITSSECONDARY
243
SEXUAL PROMISCUITY
252
SOCIAL ANXIETYSKILLS DEFICIT
259
SPIRITUAL CONFUSION
268
SUBSTANCE ABUSEDEPENDENCE
274
SUBSTANCEINDUCED DISORDERS
282
SUBSTANCE INTOXICATIONWITHDRAWAL
287
SUICIDAL IDEATION
293
TREATMENT RESISTANCE
299
Appendix A BIBLIOTHERAPY SUGGESTIONS
305
Appendix B INDEX OF DSMIV CODES ASSOCIATED WITH PRESENTING PROBLEMS
321
Appendix C CLIENT SATISFACTION SURVEYS RESOURCE MATERIAL
331
Appendix D ASAM SIX ASSESSMENT DIMENSIONS A CHECKLIST EXAMPLE
333
Copyright

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Page 2 - ... intervention. Clients and therapists benefit from the treatment plan, which forces both to think about therapy outcomes. Behaviorally stated, measurable objectives clearly focus the treatment endeavor. Clients no longer have to wonder what therapy is trying to accomplish. Clear objectives also allow the patient to channel effort into specific changes that will lead to the long-term goal of problem resolution. Therapy is no longer a vague contract to just talk honestly and openly about emotions...
Page 1 - ... delivery system, whether it is treatment related to physical health, mental health, child welfare, or substance abuse. What started in the medical sector in the 1960s spread into the mental health sector in the 1970s as clinics, psychiatric hospitals, agencies, and so on, began to seek accreditation from bodies such as the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) to qualify for third-party reimbursements.
Page 3 - Clinicians benefit from clear documentation of treatment because it provides a measure of added protection from possible patient litigation. Malpractice suits are increasing in frequency, and insurance premiums are soaring. The first line of defense against allegations is a complete clinical record detailing the treatment process. A written, individualized, formal treatment plan that is the guideline for the therapeutic process, that has been reviewed and signed by the client, and that is coupled...
Page 4 - As the problems to be selected become clear to the clinician or the treatment team, it is important to include opinions from the client as to his or her prioritization of issues for which help is being sought. A client's motivation to participate in and cooperate with the treatment process depends, to some extent, on the degree to which treatment addresses his or her greatest needs. Step Two...
Page 6 - York). 6. Diagnosis Determination. The determination of an appropriate diagnosis is based on an evaluation of the client's complete clinical presentation. The clinician must compare the behavioral, cognitive, emotional, and interpersonal symptoms that the client presents with the criteria for diagnosis of a mental illness condition as described in DSM-IV.
Page 4 - The symptom pattern should be associated with diagnostic criteria and codes such as those found in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual or the International Classification of Diseases. The...
Page 7 - DSM-IV criteria and a complete understanding of the client assessment data that contribute to the most reliable, valid diagnosis. An accurate assessment of behavioral indicators will also contribute to more effective treatment planning. HOW TO USE THIS PLANNER Our experience has taught us that learning the skills of effective treatment plan writing can be a tedious and difficult process for many clinicians. It is more stressful to try to develop this expertise when under the pressure of increased...
Page 3 - This uniformity eases the task of record reviewers inside and outside the agency. Outside reviewers, such as JCAHO, insist on documentation that clearly outlines assessment, treatment, progress, and discharge status. The demand for accountability from third-party payers and health maintenance organizations (HMOs) is partially satisfied by a written treatment plan and complete progress notes. More and more managed care systems are demanding a structured therapeutic contract that has measurable objectives...

References to this book

About the author (2005)

ARTHUR E. JONGSMA, Jr., PhD, is Series Editor for the bestselling PracticePlanners®. Since 1971, he has provided professional mental health services to both inpatient and outpatient clients. He managed a group private practice for twenty-five years and is now a staff member at Life Guidance Services in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

ROBERT R. PERKINSON, PhD, resides in Canton, South Dakota. He is Clinical Director of the Keystone Treatment Center in South Dakota and author of Treating Alcoholism: Helping Your Clients Find the Road to Recovery (Wiley).

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