Claude Gellée, Le Lorrain

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Low, Marston, Searle, & Rivington, 1887 - Artists - 144 pages
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Page 26 - In many a heap the ground Heaves, as though Ruin in a frantic mood Had done his utmost. Here and there appears, As left to show his handiwork, not ours, An idle column, a half-buried arch, A wall of some great temple.
Page 16 - that he might be able to study closely the innermost secrets of nature, he used to linger in the open air from before daybreak even to nightfall, so that he might learn to depict with a scrupulous adherence to nature's model the changing phases of dawn, the rising and setting sun, as well as the hours of twilight.
Page 8 - Mosque-like, and many a stately portico, The statues ranged along an azure sky ; By many a pile in more than Eastern pride, Of old the residence of merchant kings ; The fronts of some, though time had shattered them, Still glowing with the richest hues of art, As though the wealth within them had run o'er.
Page 17 - Does not the former imply a much more profound and inclusive study of the " shows of things" — "nature," as we call it, itself? What was it but his ideal of Helen which obliged the Greek to study all the most beautiful women he could find ? When I was setting out for Italy I expected to see Claude's magical combinations. Miles apart I found the disjointed members, some of them most lovely, which he had suited to the desires of his mind. There were the beauties ; but the Beautiful — the ideal...
Page 26 - A herdsman is seated near a pool of water which his cows are crossing. Beyond the pool is a magnificent group of trees. To the left of these trees are the remains of a temple, and, above the herdsman, a distance with hills. For technical quality of a certain delicate kind this is the finest landscape etching in the world.
Page 89 - ... occur in contemporary missal-painting ; for instance, very richly in the Harleian MS. Brit. Mus. 3469. But all this was merely indicative of the tendency to transition which may always be traced in any age before the man comes who is to accomplish the transition. Claude took up the new idea seriously, made the sun his subject, and painted the effects of misty shadows cast by his rays over the landscape, and other delicate aerial transitions, as no one had Fig.
Page 29 - ... Clings to the marble of her palaces. No track of men, no footsteps to and fro, Lead to her gates. The path lies o'er the Sea, Invisible; and from the land we went, As to a floating City — steering in, And gliding up her streets as in a dream, So smoothly, silently — by many a dome, Mosque-like, and many a stately portico, The statues ranged along an azure sky; By many a pile in more than Eastern pride, Of old the residence of merchant-kings ; The fronts of some, though Time had shattered...
Page 26 - As left to show his handiwork, not ours, An idle column, a half-buried arch, A wall of some great temple. It was once, And long, the centre of their Universe, The Forum — whence a mandate, eagle-winged, Went to the ends of the earth.
Page 93 - In the name of the Holy Trinity, the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost, amen.

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