Lives of Seventy of the Most Eminent Painters, Sculptors and Architects, Volume 3

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Page 296 - Who, were he set to plan and execute As you are, pricked on by your popes and kings, Would bring the sweat into that brow of yours!
Page 235 - ... at any time display one. particle of that elevation which, could it but have been added to the advantages wherewith he was endowed, would have rendered him a truly divine painter : wherefore the works of Andrea are wanting in those ornaments of grandeur, richness, and force, which appear so conspicuously in those of many other masters. His figures are nevertheless well drawn, they are entirely free from errors, and perfect in all their proportions, and are for the most part simple and chaste...
Page 221 - The painter meanwhile did not abandon the light attachment by which he was enchained: and one day, on returning to his house from one of these secret visits, he was seized with a violent fever, which being mistaken for a cold, the physicians inconsiderately caused him to be bled; whereby he found himself exhausted, when he had rather required to be strengthened. Thereupon he made his will, and as a good Christian he sent the object of his attachment from the house, but left her a sufficient provision...
Page 235 - But there was a certain timidity of mind, a sort of diffidence and want of force in his nature, which rendered it impossible that those evidences of ardour and animation, which are proper to the more exalted character, should ever appear in him; nor did he at any time display one particle of that elevation which, could it but have been added to the advantages wherewith he was endowed, would have rendered him a truly divine painter...
Page 201 - Raphael was at that time so much occupied with the love which he bore to the lady of his choice, that he could not give sufficient attention to the work. Agostino, therefore, falling at length into despair of seeing it finished, made so many efforts by means of friends and by his own care, that after much difficulty he at length prevailed on the lady to take up her abode in his house, where she was accordingly installed in apartments near those which Raphael was painting ; in this manner the work...
Page 201 - ... guardian of a certain lady, to whom Raphael was attached till the day of his death, and of whom he painted a most beautiful portrait, which might be supposed alive . . . (Raphael) also painted the portrait of Beatrice of Ferrara, with those of other ladies; that of his own inamorata is more particularly to be specified, but he also executed many others. He was much disposed to the gentler affections and delighted in the society of women, for whom he was ever ready to perform acts of service....
Page 212 - ... varied, and at all points so admirable, that among the many works executed by his hand, this, by common consent of all artists, is declared to be the most worthily renowned, the most excellent, the most divine. But as if that sublime genius had gathered all the force of his powers into one effort, as one who had finished the great work which he had to accomplish, he touched the pencil no more.
Page 127 - ... tender years the boy should rather be brought up to the habits of his own family, and beneath his paternal roof, than be sent where he must acquire habits and manners less refined, and modes of thought less commendable, in the houses of the peasantry or other untaught persons. As the child became older, Giovanni began to instruct him in the first principles of painting; perceiving that he was much inclined to that art, and finding him to be endowed with a most admirable genius: few years had...
Page 185 - For the Monks of Monte Oliveto, Raphael executed a picture of Christ Bearing his Cross, to be placed in their Monastery at Palermo, called Santa Maria dello Spasmo ; this is considered to be a most admirable work, and is remarkable, among other characteristics, for the force with which the master has rendered the cruelty of the executioners, who are dragging the Redeemer to his death on Mount Calvary, with all the evidences of a furious rage. The...
Page 125 - ... of those virtues by which man is rendered immortal, — so was there good cause wherefore she should, on the contrary, make all the rarest qualities of the heart to shine resplendently in her Raphael; perfecting them by so much diffidence, grace, application to study, and excellence of life, that these alone would have sufficed to veil or neutralize every fault, however important, and to efface all defects, however glaring they might have been. Truly may we affirm that those who are the possessors...

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