Applying Enterprise JavaBeans: Component-based Development for the J2EE Platform

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Addison-Wesley Professional, 2003 - Business & Economics - 470 pages
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Written by the architects of the Enterprise JavaBean (EJB) specification, "Applying Enterprise JavaBeans , Second Edition is an advanced programming guide and reference source which has been updated and expanded to reflect updates in the EJB 2.1 specification. This book is an invaluable resource for IT personnel building in-house applications and for the independent software vendors (ISVs) building applications for sale to enterprise.

The authors use example applications to clearly illustrate many of the typical problems encountered in enterprise application development, and to help developers learn to use the newest features of the EJB. "Applying Enterprise JavaBeans™, Second Edition also explores the use of EJB architecture in the construction and accessing of Web services, thus integrating applications across enterprises with interoperable, standards-based protocols and service description formats.

In-depth coverage includes such EJB topics as: Support for Web services and security managementMessage-driven beans and integration with Java Messaging Service (JMS)Session beans--including a discussion of the differences between stateful and stateless session beansEntity beans--including life cycle, persistence management, and container managementTransaction managementEJB Query Language

"Applying Enterprise JavaBeans™, Second Edition discusses when and how each EJB feature should be used in applications and concludes with a comprehensive API reference for developers. This book is an essential addition to every Java programmer's bookshelf.
0201914662B12192002

 

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Contents

Advantages of the Enterprise JavaBeans Architecture
1
111 TwoTier Application Architecture
2
112 Traditional ThreeTier Application Architecture
4
113 Early WebBased Application Architecture
6
114 J2EE Application Architecture
7
12 Advantages of the Architecture
11
122 Benefits to Customers
14
13 Conclusion
15
722 Entity Bean Class Methods
189
723 Entity Bean Instance Life Cycle
196
724 Caching Entity Bean State
219
725 Designing the Entity Bean Component Interface
228
726 Concurrent Invocation of an Entity Object
233
727 Using Entity Beans with Preexisting Data
235
73 Timer Service
236
731 Timer Interfaces
237

Enterprise JavaBeans Architecture Overview
17
22 Business Entities and Processes and Enterprise Bean Types
20
222 Business Processes
21
223 Business Rules
22
225 MessageDriven Beans
26
23 Structure of Enterprise Beans
27
231 Local and Remote Client Views
31
232 Enterprise Bean Home Interfaces
33
233 Enterprise Bean Component Interface
37
234 Enterprise Bean Class
38
235 Deployment Descriptor
42
24 Container Tools and Services
44
241 Container Artifacts
45
242 Container Runtime Services
47
25 Conclusion
53
Enterprise JavaBeans Roles
55
31 EJB Roles
56
311 Bean Developer
58
312 Application Assembler
59
313 Deployer
60
314 System Administrator
61
316 EJB Server Provider
62
32 Tools
63
33 Conclusion
64
Working with Session Beans
65
41 When to Use Session Beans
66
412 Session Beans in Traditional ThreeTier Applications
68
421 Stateful versus Stateless Session Beans
69
422 Understanding Conversational State
71
43 Overview of the Example Application
73
431 User View of the Application
75
433 The Benefits Enrollment Business Process
78
44 EnrollmentEJB Stateful Session Bean in Detail
81
442 EnrollmentBean Session Bean Class Details
89
443 Client Developers Perspective
104
45 PayrollEJB Stateless Session Bean
110
451 PayrollEJB Stateless Session Bean Parts
111
452 Client Developers Perspective
116
46 Database Schemas
120
462 The Benefits Database
122
463 The Payroll Database
123
48 Conclusion
125
Session Bean in Its Container
127
51 Container Artifacts
128
52 How the Container Manages Session Beans at Runtime
130
522 Session Object Creation
132
523 Business Method Invocation
133
524 Session Bean Passivation and Activation
136
525 Session Object Removal
139
526 Session Bean Timeout
140
53 Conclusion
141
Using MessageDriven Beans and Connectors
143
61 JMS and Communication Modes
144
612 JMS Overview
146
62 MessageDriven Bean Concepts
147
621 Implementing a MessageDriven Bean
148
622 JMS and MessageDriven Beans
149
623 MessageDriven Beans and Transactions
150
624 MessageDriven Bean Usage
151
63 Using a MessageDriven Bean in the Benefits Application
152
631 PayrollMDB Message Driven Bean
153
632 PayrollEJB Local Interfaces
155
64 Using JMS and Connectors for Communication
156
642 Setting Up Messaging Flow within Applications
160
65 Conclusion
162
Understanding Entity Beans
163
71 Client View of an Entity Bean
164
711 Home Interface
165
712 Component Interface
170
713 Primary Key and Object Identity
172
714 Entity Object Life Cycle
173
72 Bean Developer View of an Entity Bean
175
721 Entity Object State and Persistence
176
732 Timers Persistence and Transactions
240
74 Conclusion
241
Entity Bean Application Example
243
81 Application Overview
245
813 Distributed Deployment
248
82 Parts Developed by Wombat
249
822 EnrollmentEJB Session Bean
251
823 EmployeeEJB Entity Bean
255
824 SelectionEJB Entity Bean
259
825 PlanEJB Entity Bean
266
826 DoctorEJB Entity Bean
279
827 EnrollmentWeb Web Application
282
828 BenefitsAdminWeb Web Application
283
829 The Benefits Database
284
83 Parts Developed at Star Enterprise
286
832 EmployeeBeanBMP Entity Bean Class
287
833 Payroll System
294
84 Conclusion
295
Using Enterprise JavaBeans in Web Services
297
91 Introduction to Web Services
298
912 J2EE and Web Services
300
913 Security and J2EEBased Web Services
301
92 Developing a Web Service Using Stateless Session Beans
303
921 Developing a New Web Service
304
922 Exposing Existing Stateless Session Bean as Web Service
306
93 Stateless Session Bean Web Service Example
307
931 InsurancePlanAdminEJB Stateless Session Bean
308
932 Developing and Packaging the Web Service
311
94 Accessing a Web Service from an Enterprise Bean
312
941 Accessing a Web Service Example
313
943 ProvidencePlanEJB Entity Bean
317
944 ProvidenceDoctorEJB Entity Bean
319
95 DocumentOriented Web Services
320
96 Conclusion
322
Understanding Transactions
323
101 Declarative Transaction Demarcation
325
1012 Transaction Attribute Values
326
1013 Transaction Attributes for MessageDriven Beans
331
102 Programmatic Transaction Demarcation
333
1021 Transaction Demarcation by a Client
334
1022 Transaction Demarcation by a Session Bean
338
1023 Pitfalls of Using Programmatic Transaction Demarcation
343
Managing Security
345
111 Responsibilities of the System Administrator
346
1111 Administering Users and Security Principals
347
1112 Managing Principal Mapping
348
112 Responsibilities of the Container Provider
349
1122 Managing Multiple Applications and Domains
350
1131 Client Authentication
351
1133 Declarative Security Mechanism
352
1134 Security Roles
353
1136 Using the RunAs Principal
354
1137 Programmatic Security API
355
1138 Example Security Application
356
114 Deployers Responsibility
359
1142 Deploying Star Enterprises Beans
360
Code Samples
361
A2 EnrollmentBean Source Code
366
A3 PayrollEJB Session Bean Class
378
A4 Entity Application EnrollmentBean Implementation
382
A5 SelectionBean Implementation
392
A6 PlanBean Implementation Class
396
A7 EmployeeBeanBMP Class
402
A8 PayrollBean Implementation Class Using Connectors
410
A9 CCI Interface Classes
415
A10 InsurancePlanAdminBean Class
419
A11 InsurancePlan Admin WSDL Description
424
A12 ProvidencePlanBean Class
431
A13 ProvidenceDoctorBean Class
438
A14 Command Beans
442
Glossary
449
Index
457
Copyright

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 457 - Web services, in the general meaning of the term, are services offered via the Web. In a typical Web services scenario, a business application sends a request to a service at a given URL using the SOAP [20] protocol over HTTP.
Page 457 - EJB container provides the services and management functions required to support transaction demarcation, transactional resource management, synchronization, and transaction context propagation.

References to this book

About the author (2003)

Vlada Matena is a co-founder of Lammina Systems Corporation where he designs a scalable Java platform for modular Linux servers. He was the originator and chief architect of Enterprise Java Beans and a founding member of the J2EE architecture team at Sun Microsystems, Inc.

Sanjeev Krishnan, Ph.D. is a senior staff engineer with Sun Microsystems, Inc., where he works in the Java and Web Services organization on architecture and implementations in the areas of J2EE and Web Services. He is the co-author of the Enterprise JavaBeans specification version 2.0 and the author of the EJB-to-CORBA mapping.

Linda DeMichiel, Ph.D., is the chief architect of Enterprise JavaBeans 2.0 and 2.1, and is the specification lead for the Expert Group for Enterprise JavaBeans under the Java Community Process. She is a Senior Staff Engineer with Sun Microsystems, Inc., and works in the Java and Web services organization.

Beth Stearns is the principal partner of ComputerEase Publishing, a computer consulting firm she founded in 1982. Among her publications are Java Native Interface in The Java Tutorial Continued (Addison-Wesley), "The EJB Programming Guide" for Inprise Corporation, and " Understanding EDT, " a guide to Digital Equipment Corporation's text editor.



0201914662AB12192002

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