Taboo!: The Hidden Culture of a Red Light Area

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Oxford University Press, 2002 - Social Science - 324 pages
2 Reviews
This book takes you on a journey of discovery into the famous red light district of Shahi Mohalla in Lahore. The author tells her story through the lives of the people linked to the Shahi Mohalla: the prostitutes with their pimps, managers and customers, as well as the musicians and others.Through their stories, the book also highlights the contributions that these people have made to the world of the performing arts. Pakistani society has created and reinforced many myths to explain why prostitution has nothing to do with 'nice people'. These myths put all the blame on 'immoral' women who are responsible for tricking 'honest' men into sinful acts. Pakistani society has also strongly discouraged anyone fromquestioning these myths. By exposing the myths about prostitution, the book helps to eradicate a blind spot in our understanding of power relations experienced by all women throughout Pakistani society.

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this book is close to reality........i like the the way Dr. Fouzia saeed work
goood job.
HASEEB UR REHMAN BALOUCH

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Awesome book telling about the miseries of prostitutes

Contents

Shifting the focus
1
The Shahi Mohalla during the day and night
8
A Ph D girl in the Red Light Area
13
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Fouzia Saeed, with a Ph.D. in Education from the University of Minnesota, has spent the past twelve years in positions related to the task of engendering social change in Pakistan, with organizations like National Institute of Folk and Traditional Heritage, Aga Khan Foundation, and UNDP,Pakistan. She was a founder of the first private organization in Pakistan providing direct services to women in psychological crises, especially those related to rape and domestic violence.

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