Preceptive, Moral, and Sentimental Pieces: On the Duties of the Young, Issue 10

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G. Nicholson, 1796 - Chapbooks - 20 pages
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Page 7 - You may think perhaps that a little tea, or a little punch now and then, diet a little more costly, clothes a little finer, and a little entertainment now and then, can be no great matter ; but remember, Many a little makes a mickle. Beware of little expenses : A small leak will sink a great ship...
Page 7 - So much for industry, my friends, and attention to one's own business ; but to these we must add frugality, if we would make our industry more certainly successful. A man may, if he knows not how to save as he gets, keep his nose all his life to the grindstone, and die not worth a groat at last. A fat kitchen makes a lean will...
Page 4 - How much more than is necessary do we spend in sleep, forgetting that The sleeping Fox catches no Poultry, and that There will be sleeping enough in the Grave, as Poor Richard says.
Page 7 - For want of a nail the shoe was lost, for want of a shoe the horse was lost, and for want of a horse the rider was lost...
Page 8 - A ploughman on his legs is higher than a gentleman on his knees, as Poor Richard says. Perhaps they have had a small estate left them, which they knew not the getting of : they think, It is day, and will never be night ; that a little to be spent out of so much is not worth minding ; but Always taking out of the mealtub, and never putting- in, soon comes to the bottom, as Poor Richard says ; and then, When the well is dry, they know the worth of water.
Page 5 - Sloth makes all things difficult, but industry all easy; and He that riseth late must trot all day, and shall scarce overtake his business at night; while Laziness travels so slowly, that Poverty soon overtakes him. Drive thy business, let not that drive thee; and Early to bed, and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise, as Poor Richard says.
Page 5 - The cat in gloves catches no mice, as Poor Richard says. It is true there is much to be done, and perhaps you are weak-handed; but stick to it steadily, and you will see great effects; for, Constant dropping wears away stones; and, By diligence and patience the mouse ate in two the cable; and Little strokes fell great oaks, as Poor Richard says in his almanac, the year I cannot just now remember.
Page 7 - ... to these we must add frugality, if we would make our industry more certainly successful. A man may, if he knows not how to save as he gets, " keep his nose all his life to the grindstone, and die not worth a groat at last. A fat kitchen makes a lean will;" andi " Many estates are spent in the getting, Since women for tea forsook spinning and knitting, And men for punch forsook hewing and splitting." " If you would be wealthy, think of saving, as well as of getting. The Indies have not made Spain...
Page 11 - Experience keeps a dear School, but Fools will learn in no other, and scarce in that; for it is true, we may give Advice, but we cannot give Conduct...
Page 8 - You call them goods; but if you do not take care they will prove evils to some of you. You expect they will be sold cheap, and perhaps they may for less than they cost; but if you have no occasion for them they must be dear to you. Remember what Poor Richard says: Buy what thou hast no need of, and ere long thou shalt sell thy necessaries.

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