The Ascetic Self: Subjectivity, Memory and Tradition

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Nov 25, 2004 - Philosophy - 288 pages
"This book is about the ascetic self in the scriptural religions of Christianity, Buddhism and Hinduism. The author claims that asceticism can be understood as the internalisation of tradition, the shaping of the narrative of a life in accordance with the narrative of tradition that might be seen as the performance of the memory of tradition. Such a performance contains an ambiguity or distance between the general intention to eradicate the will, or in some sense to erase the self, and the affirmation of will in ascetic performance such as weakening the body through fasting. Asceticism must therefore be seen in the context of ritual. The book also offers a new paradigm for comparative religion more generally, one that avoids the inadequate choices of examining religions through overarching categories on the one hand and the abandoning of any comparative endeavour that focuses purely on area-specific study on the other."--Résumé de l'éditeur.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Acknowledgements
xiii
Chapter 1 Setting the parameters
1
Part I The ascetic self in text and history
35
Part II Theorising the ascetic self
209

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

Gavin Flood is Professor of Religion at the University of Stirling, and the author of An Introduction to Hinduism (Cambridge University Press, 1996).

Bibliographic information