Aristotle, Kant, and the Stoics: Rethinking Happiness and Duty

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Apr 13, 1998 - Philosophy - 310 pages
1 Review
This major collection of essays offers the first serious challenge to the traditional view that ancient and modern ethics are fundamentally opposed. In doing so it has important implications for contemporary ethical thought, as well as providing a significant reassessment of the work of Aristotle, Kant and the Stoics. The contributors include internationally recognised interpreters of ancient and modern ethics.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Deliberation and Moral Development in Aristotles Ethics
19
Making Room for Character
36
Eudaimonism
61
Kants Criticisms of Eudaemonism
63
Happiness and the Highest Good in Aristotle and Kant
102
SelfLove and SelfWorth
139
SelfLove SelfBenevolence and SelfConceit
141
SelfLove and Authoritative Virtue Prolegomenon to a Kantian Reading of Eudemian Ethics viii 3
162
Practical Reason and Moral Psychology
201
From Duty and for the Sake of the Noble Kant and Aristotle on Morally Good Action
203
Aristotle and Kant on Morality and Practical Reasoning
237
Stoicism
259
Eudaimonism the Appeal to Nature and Moral Duty in Stoicism
261
Kant and Stoic Ethics
285
Select Bibliography
303
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (1998)

Whiting-Cornell University

Bibliographic information