Ferns in Their Homes and Ours

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S. E. Cassino, 1878 - Ferns - 178 pages
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Page 126 - ... and the closely coiled-up fronds in the centre to be pushing upwards. They may now be safely potted. I have no faith in exact proportions for mixing soils, and my candid opinion is that the mechanical condition of the soil has more influence than anything else. Let it then, above all things, be open and porous. Use pots as small as you can in the first place, and shift them from time to time as the plants may require it, using rough peaty soil as before. If allowed to become pot-bound, the fronds...
Page 74 - ... walls are formed of solid banks of peat, which extend on either side of the plate on which the rafters rest, so as to form borders within and without. The house may be about eighty feet in length, the banks on either side are varied in outline, and there is in one spot a basin tenanted with gold fish, and surrounded with ferns of peculiarly novel aspect. •which are constantly bedewed by the spray from a fountain. The roof is a span running east and west ; the south side of it is covered with...
Page 74 - ... seasons, and especially so in winter, when rough weather forbids our seeking open-air enjoyments, and when, perhaps, if weather permitted, we should find but little in the garden or the field to interest us. One of the best structures of the kind I am acquainted with is in the garden of Alfred Smee, Esq., Carshalton. The walls are formed of solid banks of peat, which extend on either side of the plate on which the rafters rest, so as to form borders within and without. The house may be about...
Page 126 - ... good a place as they can have. Give them a syringing once a day for the first week, and after that two or three times a day ; never allow them to get quite dry. By the end of a fortnight, or even sooner, you will observe the points of new roots starting out upon the stem, and the closely coiled-up fronds in the centre to be pushing upwards. They may now be safely potted. I have no faith in exact proportions for mixing soils, and my candid opinion is that the mechanical condition of the soil has...
Page 75 - ... structure is placed on a slope, the lower part being considerably below the outside ground level. At this lowest part is placed the furnace, and there is an extra service of pipes there to maintain a stove temperature. In the middle of the house there are fewer pipes, and a greenhouse temperature is kept. At the upper end the pipes suffice only to keep frost out. Thus in one house the ferns of tropical, temperate, and frigid zones are all accommodated, and though the •whole structure is rough,...
Page 44 - AUTHOR'S PREFACE. THIS Text-book of Botany is intended to introduce the student to the present state of our knowledge of botanical science. Its purpose is not only to describe the phenomena of plant-life which are already accurately known, but also to indicate those theories and problems in which botanical research is at present especially engaged; the arrangement of the material and the mode of treatment of the separate subjects are adapted...
Page 99 - ... things as the artillery plant are grown. I have had to make as well as furnish plant cases. We have between us managed to exhibit a considerable number, and step by step we have acquired some very definite ideas about them, which I shall endeavour to set forth categorically. In the case of fern shades which fit into glass dishes, and which, as long as there is water lodged in the rim into which the lower edge of the shade rests, are airtight, air must be given three times a week by removing the...
Page 176 - hobby,' or they will rust out. Another class are engrossed by incessant professional work which leaves them every day cross and tired. These should have some outside hobby, or they will become one-sided and crabbed, and wear out." For illustration he says : " Dr. Jacob Bigelow, of Boston, being a hard and earnest worker in his profession, determined, for his own good, to select some sensible form of recreation ; and chose the study of botany, as necessitating long walks and refreshing thoughts....
Page 125 - ... Alsophila capensis as risky, and the expert need be in no hurry to obtain it. The most desirable tree ferns for the stove are Alsophila glauca, A. armata, Cibotium scheidei, Cyathea arborea, C. microlepis. Let us now suppose that some obliging friend in Australia makes you a present of a lot of tree ferns. He has found some specimens with stems from four to five, or even six feet long ; he has cut away all the fronds, and dug them up, without taking the trouble of saving any of the roots. In...
Page 68 - ... drainage. The water should be poured into the centre first to warm the soil gradually; poured against the glass suddenly it may shatter it. I have used the boiling water now for many years on every occasion of planting a fern case, and have not yet had one accident. With a little caution there is no risk. The use of the boiling water is to destroy every insect that may have escaped your eye when breaking up the peat. It will not only do that, but kill their eggs also, and equally make an end...

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