Samurai: The World of the Warrior

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Osprey Publishing, Jun 27, 2006 - History - 224 pages
1 Review
The world of the samurai - the legendary elite warrior cult of old Japan - has for too long been associated solely with military history and has remained a mystery to the general reader. In this exciting new book, Stephen Turnbull, the world's leading authority on the samurai, goes beyond the battlefield to paint a picture of the samurai as they really were. Familiar topics such as the cult of suicide, ritualised revenge and the lore of the samurai sword are seen in the context of an all-encompassing warrior culture that was expressed through art and poetry as much as through violence. Using themed chapters, the book studies the samurai through their historical development and their relationship to the world around them - relationships that are shown to persist in Japan even today.


From the Hardcover edition.
 

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Review: Samurai: The World of the Warrior

User Review  - Goodreads

The first of my Japanese Research Project books, and nearing my least favourite. It's a big coffee table book with a tonne of pictures, but no maps. I slightly resent books without maps. The text ... Read full review

Review: Samurai: The World of the Warrior

User Review  - Goodreads

This is a tentative 3-star - the writing is very scattered and overall organization is poor. The book gets extra points for the inclusion of fantastic Japanese art, and some nice photographs. But far ... Read full review

Contents

I
7
II
27
III
47
IV
71
V
95
VI
115
VII
143
VIII
167
IX
189
X
191
XI
207
XII
215
XIII
217
XIV
220
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About the author (2006)

Stephen Turnbull took his first degree at Cambridge University, and received a PhD from Leeds University for his work on Japanese religious history. He has travelled extensively in Europe and the Far East and also runs a well-used picture library. His work has been recognised by the awarding of the Canon Prize of the British Association for Japanese Studies and a Japan Festival Literary Award. He is currently an Honorary Research Fellow at the Department of East Asian Studies at the University of Leeds.


From the Hardcover edition.

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