The Pyrenees, and the South of France, During the Months of November and December 1822

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Treuttel and Würtz, Treuttel, jun. and Richter, 1823 - France - 182 pages
 

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Page 91 - The scene is most diversified. Sometimes you rise and seem to command the abyss, at others you descend, and seem to have it over your head. Sometimes, following the sinuosities of the defile, you come into an obscure inclosure, apparently without an outlet, then suddenly doubling a point, you discover an unexpected and immense prospect; vast amphitheatres of dazzling snow, black pines, and a succession of mountains which crowd together and lock into each other. The confusion of cubic and broken masses...
Page 75 - The latter city, with its Trappist, its two journals, and its pious souls, is the centre of vast projects. However, Perpignan is, for the moment, a place of great interest, if not political, yet picturesque; and I often wished for the pencil of M. Charlet, to paint the numerous fugitives with which it is filled. " The monks, who are the forerunners of every emigration, swarmed at Perpignan, and preceded the Regency. At Narbonne, I had already met the Capuchins, with their ample brown flowing robes,...
Page 135 - I had among all these people? Indeed, sir, said he, I pity you — you will sup ill — pass a very bad night — and, to-morrow, you will make a journey, which is worse than all. For us, it is nothing, we have been for a year guarding these Spaniards, who play the devil at home, and then come to take refuge among us. There is one there. «Yes my friend— what do you think of him?
Page 148 - ... the interior summit of the port I turned round, and beheld before me an immense succession of valleys displayed one behind the other. The clouds extended to the farthest line of this horizon ; but all at once, while those which were over my head were dark and thick, those in the background became light, and I perceived at a great distance the country from which I had come, perfectly illumined by the sun, and apparently enjoying the most perfect calm.
Page 132 - Thus there were about twenty pair of shoes smoaking, and the feet of the mountaineers exhibited naked round the fire. It was in the middle of this gallery that I had to take my seat. Fortunately my guide had acted as my charge d'affaires, and taken care to occupy a seat, which he gave up to me. I soon found myself seated next to the chief of a band, whose face promised me many curious stories, if I could make myself understood, and accommodate myself to his C.istilian pride.
Page 136 - You seem to be rather afraid of it. "On my good sir! When I see it, I am not afraid of it, and thank God my musket fears nobody. But my musket goes only in one hand, and this serpent of a knife passes from one hand to another; it sees you when you do not see it; and it penetrates you as it would into the crum of this loaf. "You have then fought long against the Guerillas.'
Page 133 - And the wolves and dogs ; must we not defend ourselves against them?' -• ' The guerilla said this with a careless air, but so haughtily, that my gendarme, who was accustomed to ask for passports, and not for daggers, did not venture to insist. There was an old...
Page 96 - ... were the great officers of the Regency. One of them, who was pretty far advanced in years, very tall, wearing an enormously large French hat, covered with oil-skin, and carrying a bundle under his arm, kept a little on one side — he was a minister, I know not of what department. Behind him was a tall Capuchin, in a long robe, who seemed to represent the altar near the throne. Lastly, a few steps behind them, came a young man in a green cloak, with several capes, dressed completely in the French...
Page 94 - ... found in all the expulsions of Europe. Its decrepitude, contrasted with the speedy triumph of its principles, and the pomp of its military return, form a singular contrast, and seem made to forbid politicians from prophecy. " At last I met the long-expected Regency. We were climbing a flight of steps, which, extending along the side of a hill, turned towards its summit. On a sudden, I saw a horseman at the summit of the path, who turned the point, and advanced towards us with a truly martial...
Page 133 - Castilian pride. He wore a large cloak wrapped round his body, a leather girdle from which no sabre now hung; but on the other hand I saw a rude handle projecting from the pocket of his trowsers. He had just smoked a pipe, and putting his hand to this pocket drew out a very long instrument, which suddenly opening, shewed me a dagger concealed under the form of a knife. He made use of the point to clean the bowl of his pipe, and when this operation was finished, he looked at his weapon for an instant,...

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