The Best of Poe

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Prestwick House Inc, 2006 - Detective and mystery stories, American - 232 pages
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This Prestwick House Literary Touchstone Classic? includes a glossary and reader's notes to help the modern reader contend with Poe's allusions and complicated vocabulary.Edgar Allan Poe'his name conjures up thoughts of hearts beating long after their owners are dead, of disease and plague amid wealth, of love that extends beyond the grave, and of black ravens who utter only one word. The richness of Poe's writing, however, includes much more than horror, loss, and death.Alive with hypnotic sounds and mesmerizing rhythms, his poetry captures both the splendor and devastation of love, life, and death. His stories teem with irony and black humor, in addition to plot twists and surprise endings. Living by their own rules and charged with passion, Poe's characters are instantly recognizable'even though we may be appalled by their actions, we understand their motivations.The thirty-three selections in The Best of Poe highlight his unique qualities. Discover for yourself the mysterious allure and genius of Edgar Allan Poe, who remains one of America's most popular and important authors, even more than 150 years after his death.
 

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User Review  - jrissman - LibraryThing

I've read the following Edgar Allen Poe stories and poems, all of which are in this collection: The Tell-Tale Heart (4 stars) The Raven (3 stars) The Cask of Amontillado (5 stars) The Fall of the ... Read full review

Contents

I
5
II
8
III
11
V
27
VII
55
VIII
63
IX
69
XI
81
XXV
181
XXVI
182
XXVII
183
XXVIII
185
XXIX
186
XXX
187
XXXI
189
XXXII
192

XII
87
XIII
115
XIV
123
XVI
133
XVII
145
XVIII
161
XIX
167
XXI
177
XXII
178
XXIII
179
XXIV
180
XXXIII
193
XXXIV
195
XXXV
196
XXXVI
199
XXXVII
202
XXXVIII
203
XXXIX
204
XL
205
XLI
206
XLII
216
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About the author (2006)

Edgar Allan Poe was born in Boston, Massachusetts on January 19, 1809. In 1827, he enlisted in the United States Army and his first collection of poems, Tamerlane and Other Poems, was published. In 1835, he became the editor of the Southern Literary Messenger. Over the next ten years, Poe would edit a number of literary journals including the Burton's Gentleman's Magazine and Graham's Magazine in Philadelphia and the Broadway Journal in New York City. It was during these years that he established himself as a poet, a short story writer, and an editor. His works include The Fall of the House of Usher, The Tell-Tale Heart, The Murders in the Rue Morgue, The Mystery of Marie Roget, A Descent into the Maelstrom, The Masque of the Red Death, and The Raven. He struggle with depression and alcoholism his entire life and died on October 7, 1849 at the age of 40.

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