Sheridan and his times, Volume 1

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J.F. Hope, 1859 - Literary Criticism
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Page 324 - Whatever Sheridan has done or chosen to do has been, par excellence, always the best of its kind. He has written the best comedy (School for Scandal), the best drama (in my mind, far before that St. Giles's lampoon, the Beggar's Opera), the best farce (the Critic...
Page 298 - I'll have a frisk with you." He was soon drest, and they sallied forth together into Covent-Garden, where the green-grocers and fruiterers were beginning to arrange their hampers, just come in from the country. Johnson made some attempts to help them; but the honest gardeners stared so at his figure and manner, and odd interference, that he soon saw his services were not relished. They then repaired to one of the neighbouring taverns, and made a bowl of that liquor called...
Page 182 - Th' expressive glance — whose subtle comment draws Entranced attention, and a mute applause ; Gesture that marks, with force and feeling fraught, A sense in silence, and a will in thought; Harmonious speech, whose pure and liquid tone Gives verse a music, scarce confess'd its own ; As light from gems assumes a brighter ray, And clothed with orient hues, transcends the day ! — Passion's wild break — and frown that awes the sense, And every charm of gentler eloquence — All perishable ! —...
Page 324 - While Powers of mind almost of boundless range, Complete in kind — as various in their change, While Eloquence — Wit — Poesy — and Mirth, That humbler Harmonist of care on Earth, Survive within our souls — while lives our sense Of pride in Merit's proud pre-eminence, Long shall we seek his likeness — long in vain, And turn to all of him which may remain, Sighing that Nature form'd but one such man, And broke the die — in moulding Sheridan.
Page 134 - ... and even with their boldest achievements, the meanness of a pedlar, and the profligacy of pirates. Alike in the political and the military line could be observed auctioneering ambassadors and trading generals ; and thus we saw a revolution brought about by affidavits ; an army employed in executing an arrest; a town besieged on a note of hand; a prince dethroned for the balance of an account.
Page 321 - When the loud cry of trampled Hindostan Arose to Heaven in her appeal from man, His was the thunder, his the avenging rod, The wrath — the delegated voice of God ! Which shook the nations through his lips, and blazed Till vanquish'd senates trembled as they praised.
Page 132 - Is it not solely to be traced in great actions directed to great ends ? In them, and them alone, we are to search for true estimable magnanimity. To them only can we justly affix the splendid title and honours of real greatness. There was indeed another species of greatness, which displayed itself in boldly conceiving a bad measure, and undauntedly pursuing it to its accomplishment.
Page 205 - Puff. But the Puff collusive is the newest of any ; for it acts in the disguise of determined hostility. It is much used by bold booksellers and enterprising poets. An indignant correspondent observes — that the new poem called "Beelzebub's...
Page 101 - Teach me, kind Hymen, teach, for thou Must be my only tutor now, — Teach me some innocent employ, That shall the hateful thought destroy, That I this whole long night must pass In exile from my love's embrace. Alas, thou hast no wings, oh Time!* It was some thoughtless lover's rhyme, Who, writing in his Chloe's view, Paid her the compliment through you. For had he, if he truly lov'd, But once the pangs of absence prov'd, He'd cropt thy wings, and, in their stead, Have painted thee with heels of...
Page 205 - ... and incommodation at public places ; it delights to draw forth concealed merit, with a most disinterested assiduity ; and sometimes wears a countenance of smiling censure and tender reproach. It has a wonderful memory for parliamentary debates, and will often give the whole speech of a favoured member with the most nattering accuracy.

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