Mission to the east coast of Sumatra: in M.DCCC.XXIII, under the direction of the government of Prince of Wales island: including historical and descriptive sketches of the country, an account of the commerce, population, and customs of the inhabitants, and a visit to the Batta cannibal states in the interior

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W. Blackwood, 1826 - Batak (Indonesian people) - 424 pages
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good book to understanding sumatra history

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Page 42 - Embattled in her field, and the humble shrub, And bush with frizzled hair 12 implicit : last Rose, as in dance, the stately trees, and spread Their branches, hung with copious fruit, or gemm'd Their blossoms : with high woods the hills were crown'd, With tufts the valleys, and each fountain side ; With borders long the rivers ; that earth now Beem'd like to heaven, a seat where gods might dwell, Or wander with delight, and love to haunt Her sacred shades...
Page 105 - What a large volume of adventures may be grasped within this little span of life, by him who interests his heart in every thing, and who, having eyes to see what time and chance are perpetually holding out to him as he journeyeth on his way, misses nothing he can fairly lay his hands on...
Page 221 - The positive checks to population are extremely various, and include every cause, whether arising from vice or misery, which in any degree contributes to shorten the natural duration of human life. Under this head, therefore, may be enumerated all unwholesome occupations, severe labour and exposure to the seasons, extreme poverty, bad nursing of children, great towns, excesses of all kinds, the whole train of common diseases and...
Page 221 - Under this head, therefore, may be enumerated all unwholesome occupations, severe labour and exposure to the seasons, extreme poverty, bad nursing of children, great towns, excesses of all kinds, the whole train of common diseases and epidemics, wars, plague, and famine.
Page 231 - It is perhaps the most disadvantageous lottery in the world, or the one in which the gain of those who draw the prizes bears the least proportion to the loss of those who draw the blanks...
Page 238 - The existence of this barbarous and savage practice, so revolting to the ideas of civilized man, has long been doubted, and is only partially credited even to this day, notwithstanding the multiplied and convincing proofs of its prevalence to a great extent, as particularly described by Mr Marsden. Being, I own, rather sceptical on this point, I determined I should omit no opportunity of arriving at the truth. I am fully justified then, not only from what I witnessed, and the proofs now in my...
Page 411 - It is on the left bank, and is said to have been anciently a capital town, and to have in its vicinity ruins of brick or stone buildings, containing images and other sculpture ; but time was wanting...
Page 110 - Though Nature could not touch his heart By lovely forms and silent weather, And tender sounds, yet you might see At once, that Peter Bell and she Had often been together. A savage wildness round him hung As of a dweller out of doors ; In his whole figure and his mien A savage character was seen, Of mountains and of dreary moors.
Page 149 - Here rich with heath, that o'er some smooth ascent Its purple glory spread, or golden gorse ; Bare here, and striated with many a hue, Scored by the wintry rain ; by torrents here Riven, and with overhanging rocks abrupt.
Page 239 - ... human flesh every day, is afflicted with a pain in his stomach, and will eat nothing else. He orders one of his slaves (when no enemies can be procured, nor criminals, for execution) to go out to a distance, and kill a man now and then, which serves him for some time, the meat being cut into slices, put into joints of bamboo, and deposited in the earth for several days, which softens it. The parts usually preferred, however, by epicures, are the feet, hands, ears, navel, lips, tongue, and eyes.

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