Classical Greece: Ancient Histories and Modern Archaeologies

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Ian Morris, Francoise Audouze, Cyprian Broodbank
Cambridge University Press, Jun 23, 1994 - History - 244 pages
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The archaeology of classical Greece developed in the shadow of Greek historical scholarship. Many modern developments in archaeology have been neglected, and classical archaeology has become something of a backwater. The contributors to this book review the history of the field and aim to demonstrate that modern archaeological approaches can contribute to a richer understanding of Greek society. They insist that this complex, literate and highly unusual society poses important questions for archaeologists of other regions.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
Archaeologies of Greece
8
Artefacts and art objects
49
Protoattic pottery a contextual approach
51
The riddle of the Sphinx a case study in Athenian immortality symbolism
71
Looking on Greek style Does the sculpted girl speak to women too?
81
Artefacts as traded objects
97
Positivism pots and longdistance trade
99
Artefacts in the landscape
135
Intensive survey agricultural practice and the classical landscape of Greece
137
Breaking up the Hellenistic world survey and society
171
Responses
191
Response
193
Response the archaeological aspect
197
Bibliography
201
Index
239

Athens Etruria and the Heuneburg mutual misconceptions in the study of Greekbarbarian relations
108

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About the author (1994)

Ian Morris is a history professor who earned his PhD at Cambridge University before becoming Professor of Classics and History at Stanford University in 1995. Before joining Stanford University Professor Ian Morris served as Associate Dean of Humanities and Sciences, Chair of Classics Department and Director of Social Science History Institute. He also founded and directed the Stanford Archaelogy Center. Between 2000 and 2006 Professor Ian Morris directed Stanford University's excavation at Monte Polizzo, Sicily. Professor Morris was awarded fellowships from both the Guggenheim Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington D.C. and Institute for Research in the Humanities, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Ian Morris's interest in understanding why the west has dominated the earth for the last few centuries lead to his career as an archaelogist and historian of ancient Greece studying texts and excavating sites around the Mediterranean Sea. This interest lead him to write or edit 11 books on the subject with the most recent being Why The West Rules... For Now. It asks how geography and natural resources have shaped the distribution of wealth and power around the world for the past 20,000 years and how they will shape our future.

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