Social Classes and Social Credit in Alberta

Front Cover
McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, May 31, 1994 - Social Science - 216 pages
For years scholars have maintained that Social Credit was a protest on the part of small-scale farmers, who fought against their disadvantaged position in advanced capitalism by rejecting central Canada's control of the prairie region. The protest is usually described as conservative and its supporters portrayed as small agrarian capitalists who combined their opposition to regional exploitation with a firm commitment to capitalism. Based on a review of census materials on occupations, election results, and the party's statements and appeals, Bell reveals that this traditional interpretation is misguided on several counts. He provides a greatly revised picture of the movement's popular class base and its goals and motives, and shows that it was far more radical than commonly believed. The theory of social movements Bell draws from this analysis is applicable not only to Social Credit but to social movements in general.
 

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Contents

1 Introduction
3
2 A Brief History of Alberta to 1935
8
3 The Conventional Wisdom
19
4 The Douglas Social Credit Philosophy
37
5 The Alberta Social Credit Philosophy
61
Cities Towns and Countryside
86
7 Social Credit in Power
107
Cities Towns and Countryside
129
An Alternative Perspective
140
Notes
165
References
183
Index
193
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