The Face of the Earth as Seen from the Air: A Study in the Application of Airplane Photography to Geography

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American Geographical Society, 1922 - Aerial photography - 110 pages
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Page i - The Face of the Earth as Seen From the Air: A Study in the Application of Airplane Photography to Geography.
Page 72 - This is a report of the Committee on Photographic Surveying of the Board of Surveys and Maps of the Federal Government, issued March 10, 1921, as Air Service Information Circular, Vol.
Page 71 - ... Forces in France during the War, found that geologic boundaries could be recognized on air photographs and that by means of these photographs he could correct existing geologic maps and identify formations in inaccessible areas within the enemy lines. His method was to use photographs in the study of geologic formations of areas accessible to him. Then, having familiarized himself with the appearance of the different rock formations and structures on the photographs, he was able to recognize...
Page 69 - ... scientific investigations connected with soils, forests and geology. The first reference to aerial geology was probably made by Lee in ' The Face of the Earth as seen from the Air ' (21) published in 1922, in which he states : — ' It is of interest that Col. AH Brooks, who was chief geologist to the American Expeditionary Forces in France during the War, found that geologic boundaries could be recognized on air photographs and that by means of these photographs he could correct existing geologic...
Page 71 - Proposed Aerial Expedition for the Exploration of the Unknown Interior of New Guinea.
Page 71 - The prospector should effect a great saving of time by using air photographs to guide him to places where he can find exposures of rock and to help him to avoid places where it would be useless to look for exposures. Particularly in wooded regions air photographs are valuable in indicating localities where exposures can be found in areas so covered with forest that examination on the ground would not be worthy of consideration.
Page 69 - It is perhaps premature to say much of the use of the airplane in the study of geology until it has been thoroughly tested. But it should be possible from the air to locate and map ore bodies, metalliferous veins, and outcrops of rock; for it is well known that rocks at the outcrop differ in color, in the forms of erosion developed in them, and in the kind of plants which they support.
Page 54 - American village with its fairly regular layout of streets, its business center indicated by a few larger roofs along the widest street, its lawns, trees, and gardens, the bordering farm lands, and the scattered extensions of the village into points in the direction of the main roads.
Page 102 - There is, however, need of careful research to determine the conditions under which the best results can be obtained.
Page 1 - ... reconnaissance cameramen, experienced in aerial work, returned to civilian jobs. Geologist Willis T. Lee lamented the wasted talent in The Face of the Earth as Seen from the Air, New York, 1922. He boosted the usefulness of aerial photography for "the architect, the landscape gardener, the city planner . . . given the opportunity to study their projects free from all obstructions yet in such perspective that their relation to their general surroundings are brought out as would be possible by...

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