Tycho Brahe: A Picture of Scientific Life and Work in the Sixteenth Century

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A. & C. Black, 1890 - Astronomers - 405 pages
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Contents

I
3
II
12
III
40
IV
72
V
90
VII
116
VIII
160
IX
188
X
200
XI
241
XIII
279
XIV
317

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Page 197 - The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together; and a little child shall lead them. And the cow and the bear shall feed; their young ones shall lie down together: and the lion shall eat straw like the ox. And the sucking child shall play on the hole of the asp, and the weaned child shall put his hand on the cockatrice
Page 52 - An important new star he declared was " at first like Venus and Jupiter, and its effects will therefore first be pleasant; but as it then became like Mars, there will next come a period of wars, seditions, captivity, and death of princes, and destruction of cities, together with dryness and fiery meteors in the air, pestilence, and venomous snakes. Lastly, the star became like Saturn, and thus will finally come a time of want, death, imprisonment, and all kinds of sad things! " He says that " a special...
Page 199 - Cassiopeia started astronomical science on the brilliant career which it has pursued ever since, and swept away the mist that obscured the true system of the world. As Kepler truly said, 'If that star did nothing else, at least it announced and produced a great astronomer.
Page 282 - Turkes, or they meet them /rt in open field, there is small hope in the fortifications thereof. The streets are filthy, there be divers large market places, the building of some houses is of free stone, but the most part are of timber and clay, and are built with little beauty or Art, the walles being all of whole trees as they come out of the wood, the which with the barke are laid so rudely, as they may on both sides be seen.
Page 20 - ... escaped the attention of all European astronomers before him, that only through a steadily pursued course of observations would it be possible to obtain a better insight into the motions of the planets, and decide which system of the world was the true one.
Page 88 - Hveen, with all our and the crown's tenants and servants who thereon live, with all rent and duty which comes from that, and is given to us and to the crown, to have, use and hold, quit and free, without any rent, all the days of his life, and as long as he lives and likes to continue and follow his stadia mathematices.
Page 315 - Give me a place to stand on, and I will move the world ? ' TYCHO BRAHE had given KEPLER the place to stand on, and KEPLER did move the world!
Page 131 - What is below, is like what is above, and what is above is like that which is below, for the performing of the marvels of the one thing.
Page 11 - No astronomer had yet made up his mind to take nothing for granted on the authority of the ancients, but to determine everything himself. Nobody had perceived that the answers to the many questions which were perplexing astronomers could only be given by the heavens, but that the answers would be forthcoming only if the heavens were properly interrogated by means of improved instruments capable of determining every astronomical quantity anew by systematic observations.
Page 88 - Brahe, Otto's son, of Knudstrup, our man and servant, our land of Hveen, with all our and the crown's tenants and servants who thereon live, with all rent and duty which comes from that...

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