The Reader's Guide: Containing a Notice of the Elementary Sounds in the English Language; Instructions for Reading Both Prose and Verse, with Numerous Examples for Illustration, and Lessons for Practice

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Robins & Smith, 1845 - Elocution - 320 pages
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Contents

168
179
1S2 184
186
The host of night Mellen
187
Recollections of childhood English Paper
189
Cling not to earth Wilmington Herald
190
shall be satisfied Miss H F Gould
192
198
198
The souls defiance Anonymous
203
Fable of the wood rose and the laurel Monthly Anthology
204
The soap bubble Mrs Sigourney
206
The consumptive Rockingham Gazette
207
Escape from winter Percival
208
A castle in the air Professor Frisbee
209
Extract from Cowpers Conversation
210
Shylock and Antonio Shakspeares Merch of Ven
223
Prince Arthur Shakspeares King John
234
An enigma Jane Taylor
242
Friendship Cowper
243
The retired cat 4
246
Roderic Dhu Scott
249
The ocean Byron
251
Lines written in a churchyard H Knowles
252
Eves lamentation Milton
253
S6 The deserted village Extract Goldsmith
264
Celadon and Amelia Thomson
266
Night Young
267
Elegy to the memory of an unfortunate lady Pope
268
273
273
Ode for the 50th anniversary of American independence Anonymous
280
Warrens address at Bunkers hill Pierpont
281
Birthday of Washington Brainerd
282
King Richards soliloquy Shakspeare
283
Snow storm Thomson
284
Vain anticipations Young
285
Destruction of Sennacherib Byron
286
2S7 2SS 289
292
The rose of Sharon Anonymous
298
Lovest thou me? John xxi 17
299
Safety in God Watts
300
The last judgment 4
301
Dedication hymn N P Willis
315
Resurrection of Christ Doddridge
316
Divine protection Watts
317
Going to church 44
318
Proclamation of the gospel Watts
319
Praise to God for his goodness 4
323
In that day c Zech xiii 1 Kelly
324
Gods universal dominion Montgomery
326

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Page 249 - And monarchs tremble in their capitals, The oak leviathans, whose huge ribs make Their clay creator the vain title take Of lord of thee, and arbiter of war ; These are thy toys, and, as the snowy flake, They melt into thy yeast of waves, which mar Alike the Armada's pride, or spoils of Trafalgar.
Page 311 - There went up a smoke out of his nostrils, And fire out of his mouth devoured; Coals were kindled by it.
Page 36 - Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us', even as they' delivered them unto us' which from the beginning were eye-witnesses
Page 249 - And shake him from thee; the vile strength he wields For earth's destruction, thou dost all despise, Spurning him from thy bosom to the skies, And send'st him, shivering in thy playful spray, And howling, to his Gods, where haply lies His petty hope in some near port or bay, And dashest him again to earth: — there let him lay.
Page 63 - For thy servant became surety for the lad unto my father, saying, If I bring him not unto thee, then I shall bear the blame to my father for ever. Now therefore, I pray thee, let thy servant abide instead of the lad a bondman to my lord ; and let the lad go up with his brethren. For how shall I go up to my father, and the lad be not with me? lest peradventure I see the evil that shall come on my father.
Page 313 - Lift up your eyes on high, and behold who hath created these things, that bringeth out their host by number; he calleth them all by names by the greatness of his might, for that he is strong in power; not one faileth.
Page 221 - But mercy is above this sceptered sway ; It is enthroned in the hearts of kings ; It is an attribute to God himself; And earthly power doth then show likest God's, When mercy seasons justice. Therefore, Jew, Though justice be thy plea, consider this, — That in the course of justice none of us Should see salvation ; we do pray for mercy ; And that same prayer doth teach us all to render The deeds of mercy.
Page 263 - Who quits a world where strong temptations try, And, since 'tis hard to combat, learns to fly! For him no wretches, born to work and weep, Explore the mine, or tempt the dangerous...
Page 50 - To them his heart, his love, his griefs were given, But all his serious thoughts had rest in Heaven. As some tall cliff, that lifts its awful form, Swells from the vale and midway leaves the storm, Though round its breast the rolling clouds are spread, Eternal sunshine settles on its head.
Page 262 - Dear lovely bowers of innocence and ease, Seats of my youth, when every sport could please, How often have I loitered o'er thy green, Where humble happiness endeared each scene...

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