Blackett's War: The Men Who Defeated the Nazi U-Boats and Brought Science to the Art of Warfare

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Feb 19, 2013 - History - 336 pages
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A Washington Post Notable Book

In March 1941, after a year of devastating U-boat attacks, the British War Cabinet turned to an intensely private, bohemian physicist named Patrick Blackett to turn the tide of the naval campaign. Though he is little remembered today, Blackett did as much as anyone to defeat Nazi Germany, by revolutionizing the Allied anti-submarine effort through the disciplined, systematic implementation of simple mathematics and probability theory. This is the story of how British and American civilian intellectuals helped change the nature of twentieth-century warfare, by convincing disbelieving military brass to trust the new field of operational research.

 

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BLACKETT'S WAR: The Men Who Defeated the Nazi U-Boats and Brought Science to the Art of Warfare

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Little-known story of the Allied scientists whose unconventional thinking helped thwart the Nazi U-boats in World War II.With the largest fleet of submarines (U-boats) in the war, Germany dominated ... Read full review

Contents

An Unconventional Weapon
3
Cruelty and Squalor
24
Cambridge
39
Defiance and Defeatism
66
Remedial Education
89
BlackettsCircus
113
TheRealWar
137
BakersDozen
167
Closingthe Gaps
193
Notes
263
Bibliography
281
3
305
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Stephen Budiansky is the author of seventeen books about military history, intelligence and espionage, science, the natural world, and other subjects. His most recent books are Code Warriors: NSA’s Codebreakers and the Secret Intelligence War Against the Soviet Union and Mad Music: Charles Ives, the Nostalgic Rebel.

Budiansky's writing has appeared in The Atlantic, the New York Times magazine and op-ed pages, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington PostThe Economist, and many other publications. He is a member of the editorial board of Cryptologia, the scholarly journal of cryptology and intelligence history, and is on the American Heritage Dictionary’s Usage Panel. He lives on a small farm in Loudoun County, Virginia.

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