A Poetry Handbook

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1994 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 130 pages
7 Reviews
With passion, wit, and good common sense, the celebrated poet Mary Oliver tells of the basic ways a poem is built-meter and rhyme, form and diction, sound and sense. Drawing on poems from Robert Frost, Elizabeth Bishop, and others, Oliver imparts an extraordinary amount of information in a remarkably short space. “Stunning” (Los Angeles Times). Index.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - rmckeown - LibraryThing

Mary Oliver is quickly becoming one of my favorite poets. Her latest collection, Blue Horses, pleases the eye and ear every bit as much as all of her previous works I have read. As is true of many of ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Bat - LibraryThing

This book covers the basic essentials for the starting/improving poet. Written in Mary Oliver's inimitable clear, solid language, it has enough classic excerpts to inspire generally and to teach specific poetry concepts. Mary Oliver's life and love of writing, and teaching shines through. Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
GETTING READY
7
READING POEMS
56

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About the author (1994)

Mary Oliver is one of the most celebrated and best-selling poets in America. Her books include Red Bird; Our World; Thirst; Blue Iris; New and Selected Poems, Volume One; and New and Selected Poems, Volume Two. She has also published five books of prose, including Rules for the Dance and, most recently, Long Life. She lives in Provincetown, Massachusetts.

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