New Improvements of Planting and Gardening: Both Philosophical and Practical. In Three Parts. I. Containing, a New System of Vegetation....Illustrated with Copper-plates. By Richard Bradley,...

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A. Bettesworth and C. Hitch, J. and J. Pemberton, J. and P. Knapton, and D. Brown, 1739 - 608 pages
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Page 229 - Infeft then is nourifhed by the Juices of the Tree, and grows together with the Leaves, till all its Body is perfected ; and at the Fall of the Leaf, drops from the Tree with the Leaves growing to its Body like Wings, and then walks about...
Page 16 - By this knowledge we may alter the property and taste of any Fruit by impregnating the one with the Farina of another of the same class ; as, for example, a Codlin with a Pearmain, which will occasion the Codlin so impregnated to last a longer time than usual, and be of a sharper taste ; or if the Winter Fruits...
Page 486 - ... enacts, that if any person or persons after the 24th of June, 1720, shall either by day or by night cut, take, destroy, break, throw down, bark, pluck up, burn, deface, spoil, or carry away, any wood springs or springs of wood, trees, poles, wood, tops of trees, underwoods, or coppice woods, thorns or quicksets, without the consent of the owner of such woods, wood grounds, parks, chaces, or coppices, plantations, timber trees, fruit trees, or other trees, thorns, or quicksets, or of the persons...
Page 3 - Root down the fds which do the office of Veins, lying between the Wood and inner Bark ; leaving, as it pafleth by, fuch Parts of its Juice as the Texture of the Bark will receive, and requires for its Support. It may be wonder'd at, that I have not taken more notice of the Pith ; which has been always accounted the principal Part of a Tree : To which I...
Page 18 - William are in some respects alike, the Farina of the one will impregnate the other, and the Seed so enlivened will produce a Plant differing from either, as may now be seen in the garden of Mr. Thomas...
Page 58 - ... face to face, and hinged together, so that they may be made to open and shut at pleasure, like the leaves of a book ; and now the glasses being thus fitted for our purpose, I shall proceed to explain the use of them. " Draw a large circle upon paper ; divide it into three, four, five, six, seven, or eight equal parts ; which being done, we may draw in every one of the divisions a figure, at our pleasure, either for garden-plats or fortifications ; as, for example, in Fig.
Page 18 - ... some respects alike, the Farina of the one will impregnate the other, and the Seed so enlivened will produce a Plant differing from either, as may now be seen in the garden of Mr. Thomas Fairchild, of Hoxton, a plant neither Sweet William nor Carnation, but resembling both equally, which was raised from the seed of a Carnation that had been impregnated by the Farina of the Sweet William.
Page 60 - ... sake, omitted to describe. " It next follows that I explain how, by these glasses, we may, from the figure of a circle, drawn upon paper, make an oval ; and also, by the same rule, represent a long square from a perfect square. To do this, open the glasses, and fix them to an exact square ; place them over a circle, and move them to and fro till you see the representation of the oval figure you like best ; and so, having the glasses fixed, in like manner move them over a square piece of work...
Page 308 - ... part, for it would be hot) G is shut and F again opened, when the operation is repeated as before. " When this engine begins to work [says Switzer] you may raise four of the receivers full in one minute, which is fifty two gallons, [less the quantities drawn from F for the purposes of condensation] — and at that rate in an hour's time may be flung up 3120 gallons. The prime cost of such an engine is about fifty pound, as I myself have had it from the ingenious author's own mouth. It must be...
Page 16 - Fruits should be fecundated with the Dust of the Summer kinds, they will decay before their usual Time ; and it is from this accidental coupling of the Farina of one with the other, that in an Orchard where there is Variety of Apples, even the Fruit...

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