Nigeria: The Bradt Travel Guide

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Bradt Travel Guides, 2008 - Travel - 344 pages
2 Reviews

Despite its negative image, for travelers with an open mind and friendly demeanor Nigeria is an incredibly absorbing country in which to travel. Experience the mind-boggling chaos of Lagos, the traditional durbars, Benin bronzes and walled cities, and enjoy its single greatest quality – the warm generosity of 140 million people.

Details of getting around, by bush taxi, rail, car or on foot, together with accommodations options, wildlife watching and activities, are balanced by a wealth of background information, from history (of a country dating back thousands of years) and geography to culture and the environment.

 

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Very informative and well-researched with recent statistics.

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This is the most biased Nigerian travel guide book i have ever come across. Not a very good book for those intending to come to Nigeria. I have lived and worked in the country and I definitely know this from experience. Nigeria definitely has its flaws but not as close to what this book is saying. It is a norm that places like Nigeria, Saudi Arabia are over-exaggerated with negative remarks. contrary to what she says in the book, the name Nigeria given by Flora shaw was actually gotten from the River Niger - meaning the Niger-area and not the racist 'Nigger' word which in Latin is spelt 'Niger'. Advice if you really want to know stuff about country ask at least five people who have actually been there! but then again, this book was written a while ago. 

Contents

Practical information
51
In Nigeria
61
Health and safety
89
Lagos
109
Southwestern Nigeria
163
Southeastern Nigeria
193
Central Nigeria
229
East and Northeast Nigeria
265
Northern Nigeria
285
Language
324
Further information
330
Index
341
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Lizzie Williams is a freelance writer. She has traveled extensively in Africa, both independently and in her role as an overland expedition leader.

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