English Musical Renaissance, 1840-1940

Front Cover
Manchester University Press, Dec 7, 2001 - Music - 330 pages
Second edition of a book which caused huge controversy in its first printing - now completely revised and updated. Argues that research into the cultural history of music can significantly help our understanding of the evolution of English national identity. Only book of its kind to cover such a revolutionary period in British music. Looks at how music reflected the privileged elite, ignoring the vast majority of 'music lovers', and was crucial in the construction of a British national identity. The second edition features a new and expanded introduction, a new chapter on Mendelssohn's Elijah - and the complete text has also been updated and revised.
 

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Contents

Renaissance and reformation 184094
3
A troubled inheritance 18951914
52
War postwar prewar more war 191440
83
Being beastly to the Hun
115
Crusading for a national music
164
Slaying the false prophets
215
Becoming transfigured
251
Conclusion
284
References
298
Index
318
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Meirion Hughes is a freelance historian who lives in London.

Robert Strading, now retired, was Professor of History at the University of Wales.

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