Hawks in flight: the flight identification of North American migrant raptors

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Houghton Mifflin, 1988 - Nature - 254 pages
4 Reviews
Because they fly at great distances, hawks are notoriously difficult to identify using the traditional field mark symbol. Here, birdwatchers are shown how to recognize them by their general body shape and movements. 92 drawings, 173 photos.

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Review: Hawks in Flight: The Flight Identification of North American Migrant Raptors

User Review  - Daisy - Goodreads

This is such a good guide! It is full of great information and the writing style is engaging - you can read this through cover to cover. I like it so much I just bought the second edition, which includes full color photographs (the first edition is all black and white). Read full review

Review: Hawks in Flight: The Flight Identification of North American Migrant Raptors

User Review  - Clifdisc - Goodreads

Time to get ready for Hawk Watch season! Read full review

Contents

The Wind Masters
7
The Artful Dodgers
53
Graceful Masters of the Southern Summer Skies
106
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

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About the author (1988)

Pete Dunne is one of the country's best-known birders and the author of numerous books on birding, bird identification, and natural history.

David Allen Sibley, 1961 - David Allen Sibley son of the well-known ornithologist Fred Sibley, began seriously watching and drawing birds in 1969, at age seven. He has written and illustrated articles on bird identification for Birding and American Birds, which is now Field Notes, as well as regional publications and books. Since 1980 David has traveled the continent watching birds on his own and as a tour leader for WINGS, Inc. He is best known for his birding guides.

Clay Sutton has years of experience as a professional naturalist and teacher. He lives in Cape May, New Jersey.

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