The Man who Killed the Deer

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Pocket Books, 1970 - Fiction - 217 pages
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A novel of a Pueblo Indian caught between the ritual ways of his tribe and the alien 20th-century world of the white man, this is the story of a man who lives as a stranger in both.

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About the author (1970)

Frank Waters was born in July 1902 in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He is an author of novels and historical works about the American Southwest. His first novel after college was entitled Fever Pitch (1930). He then wrote a series of autobiographical novels beginning with The Wild Earth's Nobility (1935). In 1936, Waters left L.A. and moved back and forth between Colorado and New Mexico, continuing to write and completing a biography of W. S. Stratton, Midas of the Rockies. When World War II broke out, Waters moved to Washington, D.C. to work for the Office of the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs. There, he performed the duties of a propaganda analyst and chief content officer. Waters' masterpiece, The Man Who Killed the Deer, was published in 1942. In 1953, Waters was awarded the Taos Artists Award for Notable Achievement in the Art of Writing. Waters also held positions as information consultant for Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, New Mexico. He established the Frank Waters Foundation in 1993 which is a nonprofit organization with the goal of promoting the arts, specifically those in the spirit of the creativity of Frank Waters. The members of the FWF operate under the motto "Sheltering the creative spirit", by providing a retreat for artists to live and work among the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Frank Waters died at his home in Arroyo Seco on June 3, 1995.

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