A Record of the Twenty-third Regiment Mass. Vol. Infantry in the War of the Rebellion 1861-1865 with Alphabetical Roster: Company Rolls ... Etc, Volume 23, Part 4

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W. Ware & Company, 1886 - United States - 352 pages
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Page 63 - The rebel loss is severe, but not so great as our own, they being effectually covered by their works. Too much praise cannot be awarded to the officers and men for their untiring exertion and unceasing patience in accomplishing this work. The effecting of the landing, and the approach to within a mile and a half of the enemy's works, on the 13th, I consider as great a victory as the engagement of the 14th.
Page 111 - Towards sundown the advance came across the enemy, posted behind entrenchments, at a place called Rawle's Mills, who disputed their passage ; but our forces soon compelled them to retreat, and the following morning the advance again continued on to Williamston, which place the column reached at noon, having marched a distance of twenty-three miles from Washington. Leaving the sick and foot-sore on board the gunboats in the river, the troops marched out of the town about three miles, and bivouacked...
Page 250 - In closing my narrative of the regiment, I cannot refrain from speaking a few words in commendation of both men and officers during the time I had the honor to command them. Their excellent conduct while in camp or garrison, their coolness and bravery under fire, their vigilance and fidelity at all times displayed, entitle them to the highest praise, and have won for them the approbation of all who have been in command over them. Rest assured that the Twenty-third Regiment, as an organization, never...
Page 111 - November 4th, they took up the line of march for Hamilton, within two miles of which they were obliged to halt for several hours to build a bridge, near which was a deserted breastwork, leading from the woods across the main road to a fort on the river bank. Hamilton was reached about sundown, and, like Williamston, was found entirely deserted.
Page 164 - ... (Sergeant Porter, Co. I.) The enemy's cavalry having begun to give me some trouble in my rear, and having no means to carry my wounded along with me, and not knowing the strength or position of the enemy in front, I deemed it proper to fall back to the James River, at a point called Fort Boyken. I found near this fort a signal station, where I captured a private of the Seventh Confederate States Cavalry ; also, a piece of artillery, and a quantity of ammunition, said to have been taken by the...
Page 184 - ... five paces intervened between the rebel bayonets and our inflexible line, a simultaneous scorching volley swept into the faces of the exultant foe, smiting hundreds to the earth and hurling the whole column back in confusion. Five times, encouraged and rallied by their officers, that magnificent rebel Infantry advanced to the attack, but only to meet and be driven back by those relentless volleys of musketry. Finding it impossible to succeed by direct attack, they now changed front and attempted...
Page 164 - Barney Smith," near Smithfield. During my march to this point, I had a corporal (Corporal Lord, Co. I,) seriously wounded in the right leg by the enemy's cavalry, who followed our rear guard very close. I sent my wounded men on board the gunboat, and turned over to Captain Tyffee, United States Navy, all prisoners captured, together with the piece of artillery and ammunition. I have missing one private (Thomas, Co. F,) who is probably wounded and a prisoner. He was sent with my quartermaster to...
Page 60 - Island) was the key to all the rear defences of Norfolk. It unlocked two sounds, Albemarle and Currituck; eight rivers, the North, West, Pasquotank, the Perquimmons, the Little, the Chowan, the Roanoke, and the Alligator; four canals, the Albemarle and Chesapeake, the Dismal Swamp, the Northwest Canal, and the Suffolk ; two railroads, the Petersburg and Norfolk, and the Seaboard...
Page 60 - The Congregationalist^ a weekly journal published in Boston, reported that newspapers in the South were "unanimous in admitting that their loss is very serious, and that this is far the most disastrous event of the war.
Page 181 - ORDER No. 21.] The general commanding takes great pleasure in returning the gallant officers and men of his command his thanks for the noble manner in which they have discharged their duties since the opening of the present campaign. The enviable reputation which you had attained and so richly merited, has been sustained in a noble and creditable manner, and the commanding general would not only be doing great injustice to his feelings, but to the officers and men of his command, did he fail to notice...

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