The Vegetarian Epicure, Volume 1

Front Cover
Vintage Books, 1972 - Cooking - 305 pages
11 Reviews
A friendly informal tone and some splendid recipes have made this a perennial bestseller. For all who love the fruits of the earth and the art of cooking. A classic with almost a million copies sold to date.
 

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Review: Vegetarian Epicure

User Review  - Goodreads

One of my first cookbooks as a newlywed in the 1970s, which set us off on a seven year vegetarian odyssey. Keep in mind this was pre-cookbooks with photos. You have to use your imagination! Read full review

Review: Vegetarian Epicure

User Review  - Goodreads

This book is golden! Haha, it is very clearly written in the 70's since there's a paragraph talking about socially smoking "grass" during dinner parties. That made me laugh! I haven't tried anything ... Read full review

Contents

introduction
3
entertaining
7
menus
10
tools
20
bread
24
soup
48
sauces
80
salads and dressings
95
eggs omelets and souffles
160
crepes and pancakes
183
cheese
194
rice and other grains
218
pasta
230
curries and indian preparations
250
sweets
264
holidays traditions and some new thoughts index follows page 306
288

vegetables
122

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About the author (1972)

William A. Alcott (1798-1859), physician, relative of "Little Women" author Louisa May Alcott, and founding member of the American Vegetarian Society, was also an educator, reformer, physician, and author of 108 books. He became one of the most prolific authors in early American history, and he wrote frequently on health and educational reform, as well as physical education, school and house design, family life, and diet. Many of his works are still widely cited today.

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