Margarita: A Legend of the Fight for the Great River

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Dodd, Mead, 1902 - Louisiana - 341 pages
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Page 198 - ... that murmur with fountains, where rivers like serpents lie curled, We shall pass to the wall of the mountains, crouched low on the edge of the world: Till the last low ledge of the lea Makes division, Fills our vision, We must journey in morning and midnight, we must travel in sorrow and mirth, Onward ever and outward ever, over the uttermost verge of the earth! Onward ever and outward ever, over the uttermost verge of the sea, Out over the tremulous tides and the trackless waste ways to the...
Page 121 - As the silent low light of the dawn, like a dewfall, is sifted and shed through the raiment of night. And the airs shall be smitten in sunder Before us With lightning and voices of thunder In chorus. We shall pass over desolate places, strange forest and measureless plain, And the noon shall relent and the spaces of midnight be severed in twain ; Over meadows that murmur with fountains, where rivers like serpents lie curled, We shall pass to the wall of the mountains, crouched low on the edge of...
Page vii - For out of the old fieldes, as men saith, Cometh all this new corn fro year to year ; And out of old bookes, in good faith, Cometh all this new science that men lere...
Page 179 - ... last. We are done with the Gods of our old adoration, we acknowledge they served in their turn and were fair, But we go, for behold ! after long preparation what no man has dared to discover we dare ! Till the Body and Soul and all time Shall be blended, Aspiration and virtue and crime Comprehended, We must fathom the sense and the spirit till we stand self-possessed of the whole, Onward ever and outward ever, over the uttermost verge of the soul!
Page 27 - But his great achievement — and that with which abides his imperishable fame — was his perilous descent of the Mississippi from the Falls of St. Anthony to the Gulf of Mexico.
Page 341 - I know that the officers who have no plantations, however moderately they live, cannot sustain themselves without going into debt; and those who have plantations have difficulty in keeping even with their revenues." "If success had always responded. to my application to the affairs of this government, and to my zeal for the service of the king, I should willingly have consecrated the rest of my days to him; but a species of fatality, for some time, pursuing and thwarting most of my best-concerted...
Page 61 - Ruys, a Franciscan, in the yeere 1581 ; the second by Antonio de Espejo in the yeere 1583 ; who, together with his company, discouered a land wherein they found fifteene provinces all full of townes, conteining houses of foure and five stories high, which they named New Mexico ; for that, in many respects, it resembleth the province of old Mexico. This land is situate to the north of Nueva Espanna, and stretcheth from 24 to 34 degrees and better ; by the which, and by other inhabited lands, it is...
Page 320 - ... French colony. The Natchez in the meantime securely fortified themselves in their village. Perrier proved totally unfit to meet the situation and the futility of his campaigns and his failures to punish the Indians increased their confidence and audacity. The warning came from New Orleans to France, "If it is desired to save the country which is in the greatest danger, it is indispensably necessary to send back the Sieur de Bienville.
Page 92 - As reeds in the blast, are vain, And with arrows of keenest anguish Our tortured hearts are slain; For we are the Ancient People, Born with the wind and rain! But the same Earth spreads for us and you, And death for both is one; Why should we not be brothers true Before our day is done ? You are many and great and strong; We, only a remnant weak; Our heralds call at sunset still,26 Yet ah, how few on plain or hill The evening councils seek! And words are dead and lips are dumb Our hopeless woe to...
Page 341 - ... debt; and those who have plantations have difficulty in keeping even with their revenues." "If success had always responded to my application to the affairs of this government, and to my zeal for the service of the king, I should willingly have consecrated the rest of my days to him; but a species of fatality, for some time, pursuing and thwarting most of my best-concerted plans, has often made me lose the fruit of my labors, and perhaps a part of the confidence of your Highness in me. I have...

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