Clothing for Women; Selection, Design, Construction: A Practical Manual for School and Home

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J. B. Lippincott Company, 1916 - Clothing and dress - 454 pages
 

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I like this book. There are some skirts and some blouses [waists] that I would like to try to make sometime in the future. I also think it would be nice to compare this pattern-making methods to today's pattern-making methods.
Kennoct

Contents

Circular Nightgown Designed from Shirtwaist Sleeve Pattern
105
Straight Nightgown Sleeve Designed from Drafted Shirtwaist Pattern
106
Mannish Shirt and Middy Blouse
107
Draft of Pattern for a Mannish Shirt
108
Draft of Pattern for Shirt Sleeve Collarband Collar Cuff and Pocket
111
Draft of Pattern for Middy Blouse
112
Draft of Pattern for Middy Blouse Sleeve
114
Draft of Pattern for Middy Blouse Shield and Pocket
115
Skirts and Undergarments
116
Draft of Pattern for Circular Foundation Skirt
118
Twogore Skirt Pattern
119
Fourgore Skirt Pattern having Panel Front and Back
121
Fivegore Skirt Pattern Panel Back Two Side and Two Frontgores
122
Fivegore Skirt Pattern Panel Front Two Side and Two Backgores
123
Draft of Pattern for Circular Flounce
124
Sidegore Skirt Pattern Panel Back and Two Sidegores
125
Sevengore Skirt Pattern Panel Front Two Side and One Backgore with Inverted Plait
126
Godet or Organpipe Plait Gore of Umbrella Skirt
128
Draft of Pattern for a Kimono Nightgown
131
Draft of Pattern for Straight Drawers
133
Draft of Pattern for Circular Drawers
134
Simple Problems in Clothing Design
136
Designs Showing Arrangement of Tucks Plaits and Box Plaits
138
Method of Marking and Laying Side Box and Simulated Box Plaits
141
Method of Combining Pieces of Sixgore Skirt Pattern to Design a Fourgored Skirt
145
Method of Designing Circular Skirts from Sixgore Pattern
147
Method of Designing Skirts with Plaits or Trucks at Seams Using Gored Patterns
149
Method of Designing Plaited Skirts
152
Method of Designing Waists from Flat Pattern
155
Several Arrangements of Stripes or Plaits
157
Bishop Sleeve and Sleeve Without Fulness at Top
158
Designing Closefitting Sleeve from hirtwaist Pattern
159
Onepiece Sleeves Designed from Twoseam Sleeve Pattern
160
Yoke and Sailor Collar Designed from Shirtwaist Pattern
161
Dress Form Padded with Tissue Paper to Fill Out Fitted Lining
163
Drafted Pattern Placed on Material for Cutting Out Showing Marks for Seam Allowance
164
Closefitting Waist Basted for Fitting
165
Closefitting Sleeve Basted for Fitting Padded Sleeve for Draping
166
Alterations in Close Fitted Lining
168
Draping a Simple Waist
172
Making Cardboard Sleeve and Collar
173
Draping Mousquetaire Sleeve and Collar over Cardboard Forms
175
Draping Sleeve Over Padded Form
176
Collar Designing
177
Collar Designing
179
Skirt Draping
180
Purchase and Use
182
8788 Alteration of Waist Patterns
184
8990 Alteration of Waist Patterns
185
Alteration of Skirt Patterns
187
Alteration of Skirt Patterns
188
Alteration of Pattern
189
Tools and Equipment Processes Involved in the Con struction of Garments
193
Stitches
207
Even Basting
208
Dressmaker Basting
209
Running Stitch Seaming
210
Gathering Material and Band Divided in Sections and Marked
211
Gauging
212
Shirring
213
Stitching Right and Wrong Sides
214
Back Stitching Right and Wrong Sides
215
Combination Stitch Right and Wrong Sides
216
Overhanding
217
Overcasting
218
Laying and Basting a Hem
219
Vertical Hemming
220
French Hem
221
Blind Hemming
222
Whipping
223
Buttonholes
224
Cutting Basting Seams Finishes
227
Dis covers and Petticoats
228
Plain Seam
229
French Seam
230
Hemmed Fell
231
Stitched Fell
232
Overhanded or French Fell
233
Flannel Fell
234
Shaped Hems with Featherstitching and Fagotting
235
Faced Hem
236
Facings with Shaped Edges Hemmed Stitched or Featherstitched
237
Embroidered Edging Used Also as Facing
238
Banding Mitered at Corner
239
Ruffle of Embroidered Edging
240
Dust Ruffle
241
Box Plait for Corset Cover Edges Featherstitched
242
Hem and Fly
243
Narrow Hems Used for Petticoat Placket
244
Continuous Facing for Drawers Placket
246
Continuous Placket Facing for Petticoats or Lingerie Skirts
247
Invisible Closing for Petticoat
248
Bias Facing
249
Shaped Facings
250
Fine Handrun Tucks
251
Cord Edge of Entredeux Overhanded to Raw Edge of Material Footing to Raw Edge of Entredeux
261
Embroidery Joins
262
Corset Cover Simple Decoration Tucks Featherstitching Embroi dery Beading and Lace
266
Suggestions for Decoration of Corset Cover
268
French Corset Cover Handembroidered Eyelets and Design
270
Petticoats
273
Petticoat for Occasional Wear of Nainsook Lace and Embroidered Beading
275
Drawers NightDresses
282
Drawers of Nainsook
283
Drawers of Nainsook with Lace and Embroidered Beading Used for Decoration
284
Nightdress of Nainsook with simple Decoration of Embroidered Beading and Lace Edging
290
Kimono Nightdress of Nainsook with Irish Lace Edge Showing Join of Lace on Left Shoulder
294
Kimono Nightdress of Cotton Crepe Showing a Garment Which Has been Laundered
296
Construction of Arrange Middy Blouse Man nish Shirt
298
Middy Blouse
299
Setin Pocket
301
Placing facing at Front of Middy Blouse
303
Middy Collar Cuff and Box Plaited Sleeve
304
Placing Collar on Middy Blouse
305
Silk Shirts
308
High Turnover Collar for Shirt
310
Tailored Waist
312
Tailored Shirtwaist
313
Pattern Placed on Material for Cutting Shirtwaist
314
Method of Laying a Box Plait
315
Tailor Tacking or Basting
316
Shirtwaist and Sleeve Basted for Fitting
318
Finishes for Lower Edge of Tailored Waist
319
Cuffs and Collar Bands
320
Placket Facing for Sleeve
322
Binding Sleeve
326
Shirtwaist Buttons
327
Tailored Skirts
329
SixGore Skirt Pattern
330
Placing Patterns for Gored Skirts
331
Circular Skirt Pattern Placed on Material for Cutting Out
332
Pinning a Straight and Bias Edge for Basting
333
Basting the Fronts of a Skirt Having Tuck Opening
334
Placket facing on Bias Seam
336
Plain Seam Overcast Single and Together
337
Cord Seam
339
Welt Seam Right and Wrong Side
340
Waist Line Finishes for Tailored Skirts
343
Marking Depth of Hem After Skirt has been Hung
344
Finishing Hem with Bias Binding
345
Lingerie Blouse and Dress
347
Cuff Finish for Lingerie Blouse
349
OuterGarments of Woolen Material
357
Effect of a Bias Seam in Twilled Material
358
Placket Facing for Tuck Opening on Wool Skirt
359
Placket Facing for Wool Skirt with Inverted Plait at Closing
360
Cloth Seam Stitched Pinked and Pressed Together or Open
361
Finish for Lower Edge of Wool Skirt
362
facing for a Circular Skirt Using the Allowance for Hem
363
Finish for Lower Edges of Wool Skirts
364
Belt of Webbing Fitted in with Darts
365
Silk Dress Blouse Guimpe
376
Methods of Finishing Seams of Silk Dresses
377
Methods of Finishing Seams of Silk Dresses
378
Net Guimpe Showing Cap Sleeve Collar Back and Waist Finish
380
Mini skirts Waist Linings
383
Semifitted Waist Lining Showing Front Neck and Belt Finishings
385
Fitted Waist Lining Seam Finished Boning and Hooks and Eyes
387
SelfTrimmings
391
True Bias Cutting Joined Bias Strips
393
224225 Pipings
395
Hem Turned to Right Side of Bias Material Bias Binding to Finish Lower Edge of Bias Slip
396
Lined or Stiffened Fold
397
Cord Pipings Set on a Bias Fold Having Corded Edge
398
Shirring on Cords
399
Method of Tacking Plaits to Preserve Their Shape
401
Reversed Hem
402
Bound Buttonhole for Decoration
404
Embroidery
406
Chain Stitch
407
Varieties of Blanket Stitch Plain Honeycomb Scallops
408
Blanket Stitch Detail
409
Feather Briar or Coral Stitch
410
411
411
Couching
412
Bar Tack
413
Star
414
Double Hemstitching
415
Charting Material Gathering Material
416
SmockingMethod of Making Stitches
417
Smocking
418
French Embroidery Floral Design Scallops
419
French Embroidery Initial
420
French Embroidery Infants Dresses
421
Laid or Satin Stitch
422
Seeding
423
Eyelets
424
To Teachers and Home Women
426
Copyright

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Page 78 - For, don't you mark? we're made so that we love First when we see them painted, things we have passed Perhaps a hundred times nor cared to see; And so they are better, painted — better to us, Which is the same thing. Art was given for that; God uses us to help each other so, 394 Lending our minds out.
Page 297 - Book 1. 91 p. 1917. Book 2. 83 p. 60 cents each. Hapgood. Olive C. School needlework. New York, Ginn & co., 1893. 162 p. 50 cents. Teachers' ed., 252 p. 90 cents. Hasluck, Paul N. Sewing machines: their construction, adjustment and repair. New York, Funk & Wagnalls co., 1905. 50 cents. Hicks, Ada. Garment construction in schools. New York, Macmillan, 1914. $1.10. Ingalls, Mrs. Carrie C. Textbook on domestic art. San Francisco, H. 8. Crocker co., 1911. 232 p. $1.50. James, TM Longmans...
Page 304 - Now place the right side of the facing to the right side of the blouse with the slits perfectly matched at the top.
Page 287 - Place the right side of the band to the wrong side of the garment, the end of the band to the end of the extension.
Page 69 - THE nomenclature of colour in literature has always puzzled me. It is easy to talk of green, blue, yellow, red. But when we seek to distinguish the tints of these hues, and to accentuate the special timbre of each, we are practically left to suggestions founded upon metaphor and analogy. We select some object in nature — a gem, a flower, an aspect of the sky or sea — which possesses the particular quality we wish to indicate. We talk of grass-green, apple-green, olivegreen, emerald-green, sage-green,...
Page 225 - ... three or four stitches on a side (fig. 31), to prevent the edges from raveling. This is not necessary for all kinds of cloth. 6. Start the buttonhole stitch from right to left (fig. 32A). The stitches should be so near together that no space is left between. The purl on the edge is made by bringing the thread from the eye of the needle around the point of the needle after the needle is inserted in the cloth. Pull the thread directly toward you, until it is drawn thru all the pIG „ way; then...
Page 278 - To make this placket, cut a lengthwise strip of material twice the length of the placket and twice the desired width of the facing plus the seam (one and one-half to two inches).
Page 24 - ... 1, 3, 5, 7, etc., in the first pick and under the others, 2, 4, 6, 8 ; the next pick will be exactly the opposite, passing over ends 2, 4, 6, 8 and under ends 1, 3, 5, 7...
Page 51 - Dodge, CR, A descriptive catalogue of useful fiber plants of the world. US Department of Agriculture.
Page v - THIS book presents practical working directions for the design and construction of women's clothing, including various kinds of outer- and undergarments. It...

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