Agricultural pursuits

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The title of this book is usually translated into English as Geoponica or Geoponika . Google used the subtitle ("Agricultural Pursuits") as the title, which makes it very difficult to find. I hope this note helps future researchers.

Contents

Concerning the feeding of chickens Didymus
9
To make eggs bear an inscription Africanus
10
That hens may produce large eggs and concerning tho keeping of eggs Leontinus
11
That a hen may not catch cold The same
12
To make hens vertiginous Beryiius
13
That hens may not prove abortive Pamphilius
14
To make peaches grow with marks on them Demo
15
l6 To raise peaches without stones Africanus 17 Concerning the grafting of peaches Didymus 18 Concerning the season for planting appletrees and t...
16
Concerning the various cures of hens Paxamus
17
To make apples red Berytiw 20 Concerning grafting appletrees Diophanes
18
Concerning the keeping of apples Jpuleius
19
Concerning the proving of milk Tht same
20
Concerning the planting of pears and the care of them The QuintiHi
21
Another concerning the planting of pears Diophanes
22
Concerning the grafting of pears Tarentinus 25 Concerning the keeping of pears Democritus
23
Concerning turtledoves and quails and thrushes and other small birds The same
24
Concerning jackdaws Leontinus
25
Concerning the planting of quinces Didymus
26
To make the quince assume any appearance Demo critus
27
Concerning the keeping of quinces The same
28
Concerning the planting of pomegranates and the care of them c Florentinus
29
That pomegranates may not crack Arieanus
30
To make pomegranates grow without kernels The same
31
A branch of the pomegranate keeps off venemous beasts The same
32
That pomegranates may grow red Didymus
33
How to make a pomegranate that is sour sweet Paxamus
34
That the pomegranatetree may produce much fruit Democritus
35
Having gathered a pomegranate from the tree to enu merate the kernels Africanus
36
Concerning the grafting of the pomegranate Floren
37
That the dry fruit of figtrees which are called ischades may keep without putrifying Paxamus
38
Concerning sour or immature figs Africanus 56 How one may keep green figs fresh as on the trees
39
The same
44
Concerning the season for planting almonds and the care and grafting of them Florentinus
57
When you ought to gather the almonds The same
58
To make bitter almonds sweet Africanus
59
To make almonds grow with characters on them De mocritus
60
To make the almond produce sleril fruit The same
61
a 2
62
How one may raise plants from seeds brought from a distance Pamphilius 87 That trees may not cast their fruit Sotion
63
Concerning the cure of trees that cast their blossoms or the leaves of which fall off The Quintilii 89 That plants and seeds may not be hurt by cattle or...
65
That neither trees nor vines may be hurt by worms nor by any other animal Florentinus
66
BOOK XI
67
Concerning the baytree
68
Concerning the grafting of the bay and the sowing and transplanting of it The Quintilii
69
Concerning the cypress
70
Concerning the planting of the cypress Didymus 6 Concerning the myrtle
71
Concerning the planting of the myrtle Florentinus
72
Coicerning the keeping of the myrtle berries The same
73
Concerning the boxtree The same 10 Concerning the pine
74
Concerning the planting of the pine 12 Concerning the lentisc
75
Concerning the willow 14 Concerning the ilex
76
Concerning field mice Apuleius
140
Concerning the cat Sotion j 7 Concerning moles Paxamus
142
Concerning serpents Florentines
143
Concerning ants Paxamus
148
Concerning gnats Democritus
150
Concerning flies Berytius
151
Concerning bats Africanus 14 Concerning bugs Didymus
152
Against fleas Pamphilius
154
Concerning cantharides Zoroastre 17 For leeches Anatolius 18 Concerning frogs Africanus
157
BOOK XIV
158
That pigeons may not betake themselves to flight but that they may be prompted to breed Didymus 3 That
181
6 Concerning vultures Aristotle
188
BOOK XV
189
Con
201
Malagma for the joints Pelagonius
225
Concerning the cure of cattle and that they may not swallow any hard substance Paxamus
238
tines
240
a 15
241
Concerning the buprestes 19 Concerning the colic
242
Concerning an ox that has a fever Didymus
243
Concerning an ox that has a cough 22 Concerning suppuration 23 Concerning lameness Florentinus
244
Concerning the mange
245
Concerning bile 26 Concerning a chill 27 Concerning worms 28 Concerning the loathing of provender
246
Concerning watery pustules
247
BOOK XVIII
248
Concerning admission and yeaning Didymus
251
Concerning sheep that they may follow the shepherds Africanus 5 That a ram may not be pugnacious The same 6 When a sheep is with young that y...
253
At what time and in what manner you ought to shear your sheep Didymus
254
Concerning shegoats and hegoats Florentinus
255
That goats may produce much milk The same 11 That sheep and goats may not be affected by pestilential disease The Quintilih
256
Concerning the cure of sheep Leontinus 14 Concerning the taking of wolves Diophanes
258
Concerning the mange The same
259
Compendious preparation of melca Paxamus
264
BOOK XIX
265
Another concerning dogs Fronto
267
Concerning the cure of dogs Theomnestus
270
Concerning hares Democritus 5 Concerning stags Xenophon
271
Concerning swine Florentinus 7 Concerning the cure of swine Didymus
275
Concerning wild swine Demacritus
276
Concerning the salting of all kinds of meat Didymus
277
BOOK XX
278
To bring fish to one place Oppian
279
To take riverfish Didymus
280
To bring all kinds of fish into one place Democritus 5 For taking all kinds of fish
281
Concerning the catching of fish Tarentinus
282
Baits for fish The same 8 Composition of bait 9 Another composition for laTge coracini only an excellent bait
286
For riverfish which Oppian used 11 Bait to which fish promptly come 12
287
Concerning the ptheiriasis The same 17 Concerning different diseases Anatolius
297
For mullets
298
For polypodes 43 For sepiae only 44 For locustas 45 For melanuri 4f6 Cpmposition of garum
299

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Page 200 - Then bring into this building a bullock, two years and a half old, fleshy, and very fat. Set to work a number of young men and let them powerfully beat it, and by beating let them kill it with their bludgeons, pervading the bones along with the flesh. But let them take care that they do not make the beast bloody (for the bee is not produced from blood), not falling on it with so much violence with the first blows.
Page 201 - ... be animated, having attracted a sufficient portion of air, it is again proper to secure the building with clay according to the former method: having then opened it on the eleventh day after this period, you will find it full of bees crowded in clusters on each other, and the horns, and the bones, and the hair, and nothing else of the bullock left. They say indeed that the kings are produced from the brain, but the other bees from the flesh.
Page 200 - And let all the apertures be stopped with clean white cloths dipped in pitch, as the eyes and the mouth, and such as are formed by nature for necessary evacuation. Then having scattered a good quantity of thyme, and having laid the bullock on it, let them immediately go out of the house, and let them cover the door and the windows with strong clay, that there may be no entrance or vent to the air nor to the wind.
Page 201 - ... vent to the air, nor to the wind. The third week it is proper to open the building on all sides that the light and pure air may be admitted, except the side where a strong wind blows in ; for if this be the case, it is proper to keep the windows shut on this side : but when the materials seem to be animated, having attracted a sufficient portion of air, it is again proper to secure the building with clay according to the former method: having then opened it on the eleventh day after this period,...
Page 200 - ... be stopped with clean and fine cloths dipped in pitch ; as the eyes, and the mouth, and such as are formed by nature for necessary evacuation : then, having scattered a good quantity of thyme, and having laid the bullock on it, let them, immediately go out of the house, and let them cover the door and the windows with strong clay, that there may be no entrance nor vent to the air, nor to the wind. The third week it is proper to open the building on all sides that the light and pure air may be...
Page 201 - They say indeed that the kings are produced from the brain, but the other bees from the flesh. Kings are also produced from the spinal marrow. But those that are produced from the brain are superior to the others in size and beauty and in strength. But the first change and transformation of the flesh into living creatures, and as it were a conception and birth, you will thus know : for when the building is opened, you will see things small and white in appearance and like one another and not perfect,...
Page 141 - I adjure the mice taken in this place, that you do me no injury yourselves nor suffer another to do it: for I give you this ground (and you mention which) ; but if I again take you on this spot, I take the mother of the Gods to witness, I will divide you into seven parts.
Page 60 - ... xiii. 6. There is a passage in an Arabic writer, which shews that it was not unknown in the east. It relates to the fructification of the palm-tree, and runs thus : " The master, armed with an axe, approaching the tree with an attendant, says, I will cut down this tree, because it bears no fruit.
Page 199 - It is impossible to resist transcribing this glaring evidence of antieiit folly, credulity, and cruelty: ' Let there be a building ten cubits high, and of the same number of cubits in breadth and of equal dimensions at all sides, and let there be one entrance, and four windows made in it, one window in each...
Page 200 - ... folly, credulity, and cruelty: ' Let there be a building ten cubits high, and of the same number of cubits in breadth and of equal dimensions at all sides, and let there be one entrance, and four windows made in it, one window in each vail : then bring into this building a bullock, two years...

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