Winning

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Apr 5, 2005 - Business & Economics - 384 pages
76 Reviews

Jack Welch knows how to win. During his forty-year career at General Electric, he led the company to year-after-year success around the globe, in multiple markets, against brutal competition. His honest, be-the-best style of management became the gold standard in business, with his relentless focus on people, teamwork, and profits.

Since Welch retired in 2001 as chairman and chief executive officer of GE, he has traveled the world, speaking to more than 250,000 people and answering their questions on dozens of wide-ranging topics.

Inspired by his audiences and their hunger for straightforward guidance, Welch has written both a philosophical and pragmatic book, which is destined to become the bible of business for generations to come. It clearly lays out the answers to the most difficult questions people face both on and off the job.

Welch's objective is to speak to people at every level of an organization, in companies large and small. His audience is everyone from line workers to MBAs, from project managers to senior executives. His goal is to help everyone who has a passion for success.

Welch begins Winning with an introductory section called "Underneath It All," which describes his business philosophy. He explores the importance of values, candor, differentiation, and voice and dignity for all.

The core of Winning is devoted to the real "stuff" of work. This main part of the book is split into three sections. The first looks inside the company, from leadership to picking winners to making change happen. The second section looks outside, at the competition, with chapters on strategy, mergers, and Six Sigma, to name just three. The next section of the book is about managing your career—from finding the right job to achieving work-life balance.

Welch's optimistic, no excuses, get-it-done mind-set is riveting. Packed with personal anecdotes and written in Jack's distinctive no b.s. voice, Winning offers deep insights, original thinking, and solutions to nuts-and-bolts problems that will change the way people think about work.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
36
4 stars
25
3 stars
10
2 stars
3
1 star
2

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nx74defiant - LibraryThing

Business advise. When he talked about being open with employees about the company situation, I thought of my experience where 2/3 of our work was moved out of state and management told us there would be no cuts - didn't believe it and turned out not to be true. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - watson_1 - LibraryThing

I'm a big fan of Jack Welch's leadership and writings. I'm not sure most people have the charisma to actually pull off what he did. But, this book is full of good advice that you should reference as you move through your career. Read full review

All 11 reviews »

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
UNDERNEATH IT
11
CANDOR
25
DIFFERENTIATION
37
VOICE AND DIGNITY
53
LEADERSHIP
61
HIRING
81
PEOPLE MANAGEMENT
97
BUDGETING
189
ORGANIC GROWTH
205
MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS
217
SIX SIGMA
245
THE RIGHT
255
GETTING PROMOTED
277
HARD SPOTS
299
WORKLIFE BALANCE
313

PARTING WAYS
119
CHANGE
133
CRISIS MANAGEMENT
147
YOUR COMPETITION
163
TYING UP LOOSE ENDS
337
Acknowledgments
360
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 65 - Before you are a leader, success is all about growing yourself. When you become a leader, success is all about growing others.
Page 22 - Are passionately focused on driving customer success • Live Six Sigma Quality . . . ensure that the customer is always its first beneficiary . . . and use it to accelerate growth • Insist on excellence and are intolerant of bureaucracy • Act in a boundaryless fashion . . . always search for and apply the best ideas regardless of their source • Prize global intellectual capital and the people that provide it ... build diverse teams to maximize it • See change for the growth opportunities...
Page 74 - Work can be hard. But your job as leader is to fight the gravitational pull of negativism. That doesn't mean you sugarcoat the challenges your team faces. It does mean you display an energizing, can-do attitude about overcoming them. It means you get out of your office and into everyone's skin, really caring about what they're doing and how they're faring as you take the hill together. Now, you might be thinking, "That kind of emotional bonding — it just ain't me.
Page 69 - ... the vast majority of your time and energy as a leader in three activities. • You have to evaluate — making sure the right people are in the right jobs, supporting and advancing those who are, and moving out those who are not. • You have to coach — guiding, critiquing, and helping people to improve their performance in every way. • And finally, you have to build self-confidence — pouring out encouragement, caring, and recognition. Self-confidence energizes, and it gives your people...
Page 71 - Délier. encounters, evaluating and coach___^_ ______ ___ _ ing are great, but building selfconfidence is, in the end, probably the most important thing you can do. Take every opportunity to inject self-confidence into those who have earned it. Use ample praise, the more specific the better. Besides its huge impact on upgrading the team, the best thing about using every encounter for people development is how much fun it is. Instead of mind-numbing meetings about numbers and plant tours showing off...
Page 73 - Show me a company's various compensation plans, and I'll show you how its people behave." Vision is an essential element of the leader's job. But no vision is worth the paper it's printed on unless it is communicated constantly and reinforced with rewards. Only then will it leap off the page — and come to life. RULE 3. Leaders get into everyone's skin, exuding positive energy and optimism. You know that old saying "The fish rots from the head.
Page 74 - Effective leadership management should establish trust with candor, transparency, and credit. For some people, becoming a leader can be a real power trip. They relish the feeling of control over both people and information. And so they keep secrets, reveal little of their thinking about people and their performance, and hoard what they know about the business and its future. This kind of behavior certainly establishes the leader as boss, but it drains trust right out of a team.
Page 66 - I was just promoted and I've never run anything before. How can I be a good leader?" Micromanagement often comes up as an area of concern, as in, "My boss feels as if he has to control everything — is that leadership or babysitting?
Page 29 - lack of candor" here, I'm not talking about malevolent dishonesty. I am talking about how too many people — too often — instinctively don't express themselves with frankness. They don't communicate straightforwardly or put forth ideas looking to stimulate real debate. They just don't open up. Instead they withhold comments or criticism... That's all lack of candor, and it's absolutely damaging. And yet, Lack of candor permeates almost every aspect of business.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2005)

Jack Welch began his career with the General Electric Company in 1960, and in 1981 became the company's eighth Chairman and CEO. During his tenure, GE's market capitalization increased by $400 billion, making it the world's most valuable corporation. In 1999, Fortune named him the "manager of the century," and the Financial Times recently named him one of the three most admired business leaders in the world today. Upon retiring from GE in 2001, Mr. Welch published his internationally best-selling autobiography Jack: Straight from the Gut. He now teaches at MIT's Sloan School of Management and speaks to business leaders and students around the world.

Bibliographic information