Justice Without Borders: Cosmopolitanism, Nationalism, and Patriotism

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 28, 2004 - History - 219 pages
The cosmopolitan idea of justice is commonly accused of not taking seriously the special ties and commitments of nationality and patriotism. This is because the ideal of impartial egalitarianism, which is central to the cosmopolitan view, seems to be directly opposed to the moral partiality inherent to nationalism and patriotism. In this book, Kok-Chor Tan argues that cosmopolitan justice, properly understood, can accommodate and appreciate nationalist and patriotic commitments, setting limits for these commitments without denying their moral significance. This book offers a defense of cosmopolitan justice against the charge that it denies the values that ordinarily matter to people, and a defense of nationalism and patriotism against the charge that these morally partial ideals are fundamentally inconsistent with the obligations of global justice. Accessible and persuasive, this book will have broad appeal to political theorists and moral philosophers.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The need for cosmopolitan justice
19
Conceptions of cosmopolitan justice
40
Liberalism and cosmopolitan justice
62
Nationalism and cosmopolitanism
85
Equality among nations
107
The limits of patriotism
135
Citizenship and special obligations
163
Nationality and justice
180
Conclusion
198
References
203
Index
214
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About the author (2004)

Kok-Chor Tan is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of Toleration, Diversity, and Global Justice (2000), which was a joint runner-up for the 2003 Canadian Philosophical Association Book Prize.

Kok-Chor Tan is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of Toleration, Diversity, and Global Justice (2000), which was a joint runner-up for the 2003 Canadian Philosophical Association Book Prize.

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