House Made of Dawn

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Jul 1, 1999 - Fiction - 198 pages
10 Reviews

House Made of Dawn, which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1969, tells the story of a young American Indian named Abel, home from a foreign war and caught between two worlds: one his father's, wedding him to the rhythm of the seasons and the harsh beauty of the land; the other of industrial America, a goading him into a compulsive cycle of dissipation and disgust.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - dbsovereign - LibraryThing

A poetic journey onto the rez, this book can transform you. So many of us (yes, even non-native Americans) are caught between the land and the city much like Momaday (and his character). Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jgrwriter - LibraryThing

House made of Dawn is filled with vivid imagery. This novel is not meant to "tell" a story, but rather "show" it. I believe Momaday honors the oral tradition of storytelling, with leaps and turns and ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
5
Section 3
10
Section 4
28
Section 5
34
Section 6
50
Section 7
61
Section 8
75
Section 9
79
Section 10
112
Section 11
123
Section 12
169
Section 13
187
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

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N. Scott Momaday is a novelist, a poet, and a painter. Among the awards he has received for writing are the Pulitzer Prize and the Premio Letterario Internazionale "Mondello." He is Regent's Professor of English at the University of Arizona, and he lives in Tucson with his wife and daughter.

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